Question: Where does groundwater end up?

Groundwater discharges into lakes, streams, and wetlands. This usually occurs as underground seepage. However, you may have seen a spring before, such as in the picture below.

Where does all groundwater end up?

Water that has travelled down from the soil surface and collected in the spaces between sediments and the cracks within rock is called groundwater. Groundwater fills in all the empty spaces underground, in what is called the saturated zone, until it reaches an impenetrable layer of rock.

Where does groundwater come from and where does it end up?

Rain or snow falls, and the precipitation infiltrates the soil and eventually percolates to the water table, where it earns the title groundwater. Then the groundwater moves slowly in the direction of the lowest hydraulic head, measured by the elevation of water in a well.

Where does most groundwater occur?

Most groundwater comes from precipitation. Precipitation infiltrates below the ground surface into the soil zone. When the soil zone becomes saturated, water percolates downward. A zone of saturation occurs where all the interstices are filled with water.

Does groundwater end up in the ocean?

Some of it evaporates, returning to the atmosphere; some seeps into the ground as soil moisture or groundwater; and some runs off into rivers and streams. Almost all of the water eventually flows into the oceans or other bodies of water, where the cycle continues.

How long does it take for water to seep into the ground and become groundwater?

The time it takes for surface infiltration to reach an aquifer as deep as 400 feet may take hours, days, or even years, depending on the rate of recharge. In some of the flood-irrigated areas, groundwater levels in nearby domestic wells rise within a few hours to days of flood-up.

How long does it take for rain to become groundwater?

The time it takes for surface infiltration to reach an aquifer as deep as 400 feet may take hours, days, or even years, depending on the rate of recharge. In some of the flood-irrigated areas, groundwater levels in nearby domestic wells rise within a few hours to days of flood-up.

Say hello

Find us at the office

Hostler- Pertzborn street no. 57, 67563 Kigali, Rwanda

Give us a ring

Anterio Ruebush
+29 780 790 988
Mon - Fri, 8:00-17:00

Contact us