Best timelapse settings for gh5

best timelapse settings for gh5

GH5s Timelapse Issue. By Eric Yeong, April 14 In: SHOOTING AND FOOTAGE. gh5s Hi, Thought i would share a short film, that i have worked on for some time, as the technical side of the production might interest someone here You can see the film here. http://www.ekkofilm.dk/shortlist/film/nem-dating/ There are no subtitles, but the synopsis is this: A young high school student gets an after hours job, to pay for. a trip around the world with his girlfriend. The job is as a promoter for an online dating site, where he writes to girls there, to keep them as subscribers of the site. One day he realises, that one of the girls are someone close to him, and he tries to make thi .

best timelapse settings for gh5

• Published on: Thursday, October 26, 2017 • Quick example of how i shoot TimeLapse with GH5 & 42.5 1.2 Noc Gear Used : GH5 Lenses : Camera used GH5 http://amzn.to/2AaQvrk GH5 LowLight Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 https://youtu.be/tdYghgQkOpk http://amzn.to/2hVANq1 15mm 1.7 Leica Summilux Lowlight Test http://amzn.to/2A8Ck6b https://youtu.be/VJFvppdRt7M 12-60 2.8-4 Leica Test http://amzn.to/2iTLHgN https://youtu.be/4d9LPEup9qE Tracking Tutorial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5-aJ...

Sky Replacement Tutorial After Effects VFX https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Iv8X... Slomotion Tutorial Premier Pro CC https://youtu.be/Q_2ebyFN_IQ Adobe Creative Cloud Lightroom Premiere Pro http://www.adobe.com Best Place For SoundTrack https://player.epidemicsound.com • Source: https://youtu.be/voi4Aq41EVo • • • • GH5 TimeLapse Tutorial •


best timelapse settings for gh5

best timelapse settings for gh5 - Best GoPro Time Lapse Settings for Improved Photography : CamDo


best timelapse settings for gh5

I am working on a video and part of it I want to do a time lapse of the sunrise from the top of a hill, looking down over open fields. The time lapse needs to last 6 minutes. Since I have only done time lapses with my Canon 600D in the past (with not the best results), I don 't really know what to do when doing this with my Panasonic GH5.

I want to start the time lapse when its still a little dark but bright enough to see, just before the sun starts rising, then capture the sun as it rises. I currently don't have a battery grip and only one battery I can use.

The lens I want to use is the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 pro at 12mm, probably at f/4 where I found the lens to be the sharpest at 12mm, Can anyone help me with what settings to use on the GH5 for this? -- If find that the best way to live life, is not in the pursuit of material possessions, but its to live in the pursuit of making positive differences to both other people and to the planet as a whole and if you can get others to do similar or the same, so much the better.

Funnily enough I did this just this morning (my first attempt at a dark>dawn timelapse), and I'll let you know what worked (and didn't) for me: What worked: Hyperfocal distance, manual focus - I wanted some objects in front to be in focus as well as the horizon, and this worked out.

Length - I started at about 4:30AM PDT, and set it up for 900 shots RAW+JPEG (enough to almost fill my 32GB card, and in fact this was more than I needed). RAW+JPEG was just what my camera is normally set to - I'll probably set it to just RAW for my next attempt. I set the interval to one shot every 15 seconds, and when I generated the movie at the end I set it to 10fps - this made for a nice, smooth timelapse no big judders between shots.

These settings resulted in a 90 second timelapse, so you'll need to adjust for your requirements (either lower framerate or larger card?). Solid tripod, low to the ground. What didn't: Program mode - I was halfway there, I think... I think Aperture mode is the way to go, so the camera can set the shutter speed itself to help avoid "flicker" in the final timelapse. It won't take any shots longer than 15 seconds due to the timelapse interval. AEL - I didn't set an exposure point for the foreground, so it was exposing for the whole frame (the sky being the dominant element)...

which by the time the sun was up was fine, but I have next to no detail in the foreground. Not super sure how to manage this to prevent overexposure (I really don't want to have to babysit the camera for hours if I can avoid it, though I know that would be optimal), but I'm hoping ISO is the key (see below).

What I'm not sure about: AutoISO - I initially thought this would give me some extra latitude in those first hours where the light is low, and help generate a smoother transition.

My max ISO is 1600, which I felt was manageable if I needed to de-noise or anything but I'm wondering if I should have just set it to 200. I'm not sure if setting this to 200 is going to end up creating a big exposure jump once the sun actually comes up or anything, but I'll be trying it again tomorrow morning to see what happens. At any rate, good luck! The Panasonic menu system makes generating timelapses stupidly easy, and the GH5's weather-sealing meant I didn't need to worry much about dew or dust over the length of the shoot.

GCharma wrote: Funnily enough I did this just this morning (my first attempt at a dark>dawn timelapse), and I'll let you know what worked (and didn't) for me: What worked: Hyperfocal distance, manual focus - I wanted some objects in front to be in focus as well as the horizon, and this worked out. Length - I started at about 4:30AM PDT, and set it up for 900 shots RAW+JPEG (enough to almost fill my 32GB card, and in fact this was more than I needed).

RAW+JPEG was just what my camera is normally set to - I'll probably set it to just RAW for my next attempt. I set the interval to one shot every 15 seconds, and when I generated the movie at the end I set it to 10fps - this made for a nice, smooth timelapse no big judders between shots. These settings resulted in a 90 second timelapse, so you'll need to adjust for your requirements (either lower framerate or larger card?).

Solid tripod, low to the ground. What didn't: Program mode - I was halfway there, I think... I think Aperture mode is the way to go, so the camera can set the shutter speed itself to help avoid "flicker" in the final timelapse. It won't take any shots longer than 15 seconds due to the timelapse interval. AEL - I didn't set an exposure point for the foreground, so it was exposing for the whole frame (the sky being the dominant element)...

which by the time the sun was up was fine, but I have next to no detail in the foreground. Not super sure how to manage this to prevent overexposure (I really don't want to have to babysit the camera for hours if I can avoid it, though I know that would be optimal), but I'm hoping ISO is the key (see below).

What I'm not sure about: AutoISO - I initially thought this would give me some extra latitude in those first hours where the light is low, and help generate a smoother transition. My max ISO is 1600, which I felt was manageable if I needed to de-noise or anything but I'm wondering if I should have just set it to 200.

I'm not sure if setting this to 200 is going to end up creating a big exposure jump once the sun actually comes up or anything, but I'll be trying it again tomorrow morning to see what happens. At any rate, good luck! The Panasonic menu system makes generating timelapses stupidly easy, and the GH5's weather-sealing meant I didn't need to worry much about dew or dust over the length of the shoot. I have an 8lbs tripod with screws on the feet that can be puhed into soft ground, so no problem with a tripod.

I also use 2 128GB cards which might work (maybe, probably not given my calculation), My calculation makes me think what I want to do won't work as I want to make the video in 25fps (the rest of the video is in 25fps) and I need about 5:50 seconds and want to record the time lapse for 3 hours so I'd need a total of 8750 images at 2 second intervals, which is a long time making me think the battery won't last taking images every 2 seconds and my cards may fill up before this is finished too, taking that amount of images My other thought is that I could take a video instead and speed it up in editng, but I'd get no RAW then (I don't really like how the normal picture profile colors look) and I do have V-Log L and could use that, but I want to keep the aperture constant and the exposure no higher than 1 stop over exposed to prevent over exposure, I have no idea if that would be possible without attaching a variable ND and changing it, but then I'd risk touching the camera and maybe moving it ever so slightly.

-- If find that the best way to live life, is not in the pursuit of material possessions, but its to live in the pursuit of making positive differences to both other people and to the planet as a whole and if you can get others to do similar or the same, so much the better. GCharma wrote: Hyperfocal distance, manual focus - I wanted some objects in front to be in focus as well as the horizon, and this worked out.

I agree that manual focus is a must for time lapse shots. And I'd add manual white balance as well, most easily achieve by using one of the presets. I usually use "shade" white balance for sunrises and sunsets because it accentuates the golden tint - but if you're shooting RAW then this isn't so much of an issue.

If you're concerned about battery life then once the time lapse is going you can save some juice by hitting the "Disp" button until the display or viewfinder turns off (although the GH5 seems to be pretty smart about this for time lapses shot with longer intervals).

So, my next attempt changed both the mode (P to A) and ISO (Auto to 200) and I must say I had a far more flicker-prone experience... that transition from first light to dawn was terrible, and it looks like the camera was trying to adjust every few frames which made for a lot of brightness issues.

Full manual I think would lead to exposure issues once daylight comes, so I'm stuck figuring out either the right shutter speed to not overexpose when using AutoISO, or going full manual and having a lot of dark shots. I'll give them both a shot and see what happens.

A couple things about your approach - from a power perspective, I've been using one of those AC adapters to good effect. Based on the number of shots you're looking to take this might be a necessity. The other point was the interval between shots - do you need to have it down to 2 seconds? Only reason I ask is that you'll be limiting the possible shutter speed to no more than 2 seconds which might not be good for the earliest light shots...

though I guess based on my experience this may or may not be a problem depending on how much exposure automation you use. GCharma wrote: So, my next attempt changed both the mode (P to A) and ISO (Auto to 200) and I must say I had a far more flicker-prone experience... that transition from first light to dawn was terrible, and it looks like the camera was trying to adjust every few frames which made for a lot of brightness issues.

Full manual I think would lead to exposure issues once daylight comes, so I'm stuck figuring out either the right shutter speed to not overexpose when using AutoISO, or going full manual and having a lot of dark shots.

I'll give them both a shot and see what happens. Caveat - I am using a G85, but assuming it is going to be similar to the GH5. Aperture priority flicker: I am told that slightly inconsistent frame-to-frame aperture opening performance that would not be noticeable in stills can cause noticeable flicker in a time lapse. Full manual: Yes, picking one manual exposure can either provide too little exposure in the dark and/or too much exposure after sunrise.

One solution for this is to use "" hardware that can vary the exposure over time using the camera remote control function.

I haven't spent the cash on one of these, but the serious pros use them. They program in the optimal night exposure to start, the optimal day exposure to end, and have the little black box interpolate the in between exposures.

Most of these can control Canon/Nikon, not sure which ones support Panasonic. (You probably already know not to change the aperture during time lapse since that would change the depth of field.) Both problems can also be addressed using or similar software. You manually change the shutter speed or ISO on the camera during the time lapse, and LRTimelapse analyzes the image metadata to automatically smooth out the exposure bumps that you would normally get.

E.g. if you went from ISO 800 to 200 because the sun is coming up and about to blow out your frame, LRTimelapse would detect the sudden break in metadata and adjust the develop exposure at the ISO change point to be visually smooth. LRTimelapse also fixes the aperture flicker problem with an adjustable "Visual Deflicker" slider. To address the limited battery life I got a battery coupler which goes out the hole in the door of a G85 and connects by USB power to an AC adapter or USB battery pack for field use.

Yeah, I haven't come across a bulb ramper that's compatible with Panasonic/Olympus bodies yet, but I'll be honest and say I haven't looked a ton either... I'd just as soon try to average out the flicker using what I have that add a pretty specialized tool to my kit. On the other hand, I tried LRTimelapse a couple years ago and was impressed with what it can do. I might revisit it and see if it will smooth out the issues once I get things as close to flicker-free as I can without.

Thanks! DNature wrote: I need about 5:50 seconds and want to record the time lapse for 3 hours so I'd need a total of 8750 images at 2 second intervals, which is a long time making me think the battery won't last taking images every 2 seconds and my cards may fill up before this is finished too, taking that amount of images With dual slots in the GH5, just set slot 2 to overflow. Once card 1 fills up, the images will start recording to slot 2.

Also, don't both with shooting JPEG, just shoot RAW. You'll get much better results, being able to lift the shadows during blue hour, and pull the highlights back during golden hour. Lastly, why a 2s interval? That's extremely short. I would think you should be fine with 5s, and if it's a cloudless morning you could probably get away with 10s or even 15s between shots.

This will GREATLY reduce the number of images you need to take. My other thought is that I could take a video instead and speed it up in editng, but I'd get no RAW then (I don't really like how the normal picture profile colors look) and I do have V-Log L and could use that, but I want to keep the aperture constant and the exposure no higher than 1 stop over exposed to prevent over exposure, I have no idea if that would be possible without attaching a variable ND and changing it, but then I'd risk touching the camera and maybe moving it ever so slightly.

Don't shoot video. 3 hours worth of 4K video, you're asking for a headache in post. You don't get the same flexibility that you do with a RAW file, even with V-Log L. Anytime I've shot sunrise time lapses, it's been in Aperture priority, fixed ISO (provided shutter speed could handle it), manual focus, manual white balance.

It's worked out very well for me, and the menu in the Panasonic cameras makes it easy as pie. GCharma wrote: So, my next attempt changed both the mode (P to A) and ISO (Auto to 200) and I must say I had a far more flicker-prone experience... that transition from first light to dawn was terrible, and it looks like the camera was trying to adjust every few frames which made for a lot of brightness issues.

Full manual I think would lead to exposure issues once daylight comes, so I'm stuck figuring out either the right shutter speed to not overexpose when using AutoISO, or going full manual and having a lot of dark shots. I'll give them both a shot and see what happens. A sunrise time lapse presents what's probably the most extreme range of exposure variation possible, and so I don't think you're going to be entirely successful in eliminating obvious changes in exposure.

But I've found that you can pretty much eliminate them in post-production by using animation to vary the tone curve along each of the exposure "segments" so that the appearance of the last frame before an exposure adjustment looks the same as the appearance of the first frame afterwards. I've done this using Premiere Pro and it works fairly well, IMHO - certainly far better than the uncorrected raw footage. But you need to have the exposures at least reasonably close - I'd suggest making sure the camera is set to use 1/3 stop exposure values rather than 1/2 stop.

In terms of adjusting exposure, I still think manual is the way to go because it avoids the kind of "hunting" that might cause the camera to change exposures one way for one frame and then back to the original for the next frame because the metered brightness is right on the "edge" between the two exposure values.

You're still going to get exposure steps when you change from one exposure value to another in manual mode, but you'll probably get fewer of them than if you try to use one of the automatic exposure modes. The fewer of these kinds of changes you have the less work it is to fix them in post. Another suggestion that you might try (but I haven't used it myself) is to use a variable ND filter to vary the exposure - it has the advantage of being stepless.

But you're still at the mercy of an exposure meter that's only going to show you results in discrete steps. ijm5012 wrote: Don't shoot video. 3 hours worth of 4K video, you're asking for a headache in post. You don't get the same flexibility that you do with a RAW file, even with V-Log L.

All that is true, plus: When you shoot stills, you record every one of the 20 megapixels the GH5 can capture, the rough equivalent of 5K. If you later want to crop in, or animate some movement into the time lapse, or even just correct a tilted horizon, you can do that and still have more than enough pixels left over for full detail 2K or 4k video output. If you shoot 3 hours of 4K video, you are limited to the 4K of the video recording feature. The shot you get is all have to work with.

Any cropping or other spatial edits will result in loss of detail unless you are doing 2K output or lower.


best timelapse settings for gh5

is, by its very nature, a time consuming endeavour. It typically involves taking and processing hundreds of images. It really pays to plan your shoot and time-lapse settings accordingly. I wouldn’t say there are any ‘best’ time-lapse photography settings. These can vary depending on the and the subject – just like conventional photography. There are, however, some general principles regarding time-lapse settings. Let’s start by considering the issue of timing and then talk about Time Lapse Frame Rate A video is just a sequence of still images shown in quick succession.

If we view the sequence at a too slow speed, the result will exhibit an annoying flicker. Speed the sequence up sufficiently and an effect called the phi phenomenon will generate the illusion of a smooth fluid motion. This happens at around 12 frames per seconds. As a reference, most contemporary films are shot at 24 fps, which most people agree looks natural.

You don’t have to worry too much about the frame rate when you’re shooting your time lapse sequence. This is decided later on when all the images are combined into the final video. You will, however, need to consider how fast the action is taking place.

Otherwise, you’ll end up with a series of stills as shown here: The rate at which you photograph your subject depends on how fast it’s moving. A high speed video camera can take hundreds of frames per second to slow down the action. Normal video is shot at around 25 or 30 frames per second. Time lapse rates can be anything from around one frame per second to one frame every few hours.

In the past, different frame rates and TV standards made it difficult to share videos and view them on different devices. Today, with digital TV, we can view just about any video on our computer. The most common frame rates are 24 fps, 25 fps and 30 fps.

Let’s assume our time lapse video will be viewed at 25 fps. This means we need to take 25 photos for each second of our final time lapse video. If you’re just beginning to experiment with time lapse photography, don’t try to make an epic feature film. Instead, aim for something more achievable – lasting say 30 seconds. If we want to make a 30 second long production we will need 30 seconds x 25 fps = 750 photos. Ideally, we’d like to capture all these images on a single memory card. Memory Card Capacity You can shoot JPEG images if you want to fit as many images as possible onto a given media card.

I would, however, recommend that you for maximum post-production flexibility. Check the file size of a single raw photo for your chosen camera. Make sure you have room for 750 such images on your memory card. For example, on a Canon 5D Mk III the raw file size is around 30MB. Multiplying 30MB by 750 gives 22,500MB or 22.5 GB.

will easily handle this many raw images. Once you’ve set your camera’s image size and quality settings, the number of remaining shots should be visible on your camera’s LCD.

You will not be recording a burst of images in rapid succession. This means that the write speed of the media cards you use for time lapse (CF or SD) is not as important as their capacity. If you don’t have a high capacity memory card, you can just keep an eye on the remaining exposures. Swap in a new smaller capacity card each time you run out.

For time lapse, a high capacity card doesn’t have to be of the expensive high speed variety. It’s the capacity that counts – not the write speed. Time-Lapse Interval So we want to produce a 30 second time-lapse video and we want to take 750 separate photos.

Now, you have to decide on the length of the actual photo shoot. The length of the shoot depends on the subject. Filming a flower opening may take a day or two. A major construction project could involve months. Long time lapse projects can get complicated. You will need to consider how to keep the camera powered up for long periods and how to cope with changing light levels.

And you’ll need to arrange for images to be automatically transferred to a hard drive. For these reasons, it’s best to start with a relatively short term subject that you can shoot for an hour or two. This could be something like boats on a river, a cityscape or just cloud formations. Calculating the Shooting Interval Let’s suppose we wanted to film two hours of activity of our chosen subject. The interval we need to program into our camera or external intervalometer is just two hours (2 x 60 x 60 = 7200 seconds) divided by the number of shots in our sequence.

We’ve determined this is going to be 750. That gives us 7200 seconds divided by 750 images which equals 9.6 seconds. We can just round this up and get the camera to take one shot every ten seconds until we have 750 photos on the card. If you don’t want to do the maths yourself, there are plenty of handy time lapse calculators you can download to your phone. Some are free and others, like the PhotoPills app, require a modest payment.

The PhotoPills app is usually associated with planning . It’s actually a Swiss Army knife for photographers that includes a time lapse calculator among its many useful tools. The PhotoPills time lapse calculator does all the maths for you. In this case, a finished time lapse of 30 seconds capturing 30 minutes of real-time action to be viewed at 25 fps where each image is 4MB in size, gives a shooting interval of 2.4 seconds until 750 photos have been taken.

All this will require a memory card with a capacity of at least 2.93GB. DSLR Time-Lapse Photography are not specifically designed for time-lapse photography. This presents some practical limitations when shooting images for a time -lapse video. In our example, the camera would be clicking away at one shot every ten seconds. This means that later we can compress two hours of shooting into thirty seconds of video. This would produce a video that appears to run at 240 times the normal speed.

It can be somewhat manic and unnerving. If instead we wanted to capture the same time period but make it appear to be just twenty times normal speed, our two hour session would have to replay in 7200 / 20 = 360 seconds. This would require 360 seconds x 25fps = 9000 shots. In order to fit 9000 shots into a two hour shoot, we would need to take one photo every 0.8 seconds. Few people want to so casually add 9000 to their shutter count.

And 9000 raw images at 30MB a pop would need 270GB of storage! This is a worst-case scenario. If you were shooting JPEG images, each one is more likely to be just four or five MB. When multiplied by 9000, it is still a considerable amount of disc space. Using a DSLR to capture many high resolution images and combining them into a video in post certainly has its limitations.

The big advantage of this method is that it can give extremely high quality results. This is because of the dynamic range and resolution it offers. Resolution is a very important and fundamental setting for time lapse. Let’s consider this in a little more detail. DSLR vs Video Resolution Two of the most fundamental settings on any camera are the image size (resolution) and image format (JPEG vs raw). Image resolution is related to the density of pixels on your camera’s sensor or on the display device.

The higher the resolution, the more fine detail you can see. Computer monitors, TVs and cameras have for years been following a relentless path toward ever greater resolution. However, there is no standardisation between the resolution of your flat screen TV and that of your camera. The average DSLR has a much higher resolution than a 4K UHD TV (and a different aspect ratio).

This means that we don’t always have to shoot at the full resolution afforded by our camera. Here’s a scale comparison of some TV screen resolutions and the resolution of a typical DSLR. A single image from a Canon 5D Mk III has far more pixels than needed to show on a full HD or even a 4K Ultra HD TV screen. The Canon 80D has an APS-C (cropped) sensor but still sports 6000 x 4000 pixels.

The background image shows the size in pixels that you’d typically obtain from a modern DSLR. The overlays show the pixel dimensions for both full HD and 4K Ultra HD video. As you can see, the image from the camera is much larger than that actually needed to display on an HD TV – even a so called ‘4K’ TV.

Clearly, some image will be required. This will prepare your time lapse images for their intended display. When your images are all larger than needed for the video format you’ve chosen, you will have the ability to introduce zoom and pan effects in post-production.

This is known as the ‘Ken Burns’ effect. It can add interest to any video originally shot from a fixed perspective. If you want to produce a video to show on a full HD TV (1920 x 1080), notice that the image from the camera is around ten times bigger than it really needs to be. If you want to introduce some subtle zoom and pan effects, this is probably excessively large for that. Remember that making videos from many hundreds of images places a significant workload on your computer.

It also takes up a great deal of storage space. Processing images that are larger than they need to be will only make video production slow and frustrating. One way to make the whole process more streamlined is to set your camera to work at a lower resolution.

Check the ‘Image Quality’ settings on your camera. This is the screen that enables you to select the size and compression of the JPEG images your camera makes. For most cameras that shoot raw, you can also select the raw resolution. In this example, I’ve selected a medium resolution raw setting: At this setting, the raw image is still large enough to more than fill the screen on a 4K UHD TV.

It can also supply plenty of room for zooming and if you want to make a video for a standard HD TV. The file size it produces is half that of the full resolution setting. You’ll be able to store twice as many images on the same media card. And your computer will process them more easily while you retain the full dynamic range afforded by using raw files. Raw vs JPEG You should always aim to keep as much information in your images as you can during the workflow.

This keeps your creative options open. We’ve already seen that we don’t always need to capture the full resolution a DSLR camera offers. What we do want is to maintain maximum ability to adjust shadows and highlights in each image. This is particularly important if the camera is photographing a high contrast scene or one where the lighting conditions change considerably during the shoot. Raw files contain the maximum definition when recording the brightness in the scene (known as dynamic range).

They are also able to distinguish between many more brightness levels than a JPEG image. (and indeed your eyes) cannot show that full tonal range. But it does give your computer a major advantage when it comes to tonal adjustments without causing gaps in the image histogram that can otherwise lead to ‘banding’.

Camera Settings for Individual Photos So far, we’ve considered only the fundamental settings associated with the length and the resolution of your finished video. Since we’re concentrating on making a time lapse video from a series of still photos, we now need to turn our attention to the settings needed for each individual photo.

Again, there are no ‘correct’ time-lapse settings. These depend on the subject and in this respect, it’s no different to any still photograph. However, as you’ll be taking hundreds of images, an important consideration is consistency from one image to the next.

This helps to avoid flickering or other transient effects when we view the sequence of images at the intended frame rate. Unless you want to photograph a situation where the lighting level is going to change significantly during the shoot, such as a sunset, you should aim to maintain a constant exposure value. This means selecting a shutter speed and aperture that works well for your chosen subject.

And then using those same settings for all the other images in the shoot. The only way to ensure values don’t change is to set your camera to In order to obtain consistent exposures and help avoid flicker, set your camera mode dial to Manual.

Adjust the aperture and ISO, aperture and shutter speed just once. Take a test shot before you start recording your sequence and adjust for the ideal exposure by checking the histogram. If you set your camera to a semi-automatic mode such as aperture or shutter priority, the camera will calculate a new exposure value for each photo .

This will be based on whatever is happening in the scene at the time. It can make a noticeable difference in exposure as subjects in your scene move around. This is particularly relevant if your metering is set to spot or centre-weighted mode. Allowing the camera to alter the aperture can also introduce unwanted depth-of-field changes. Another setting that should generally remain fixed is focus. You certainly don’t want the camera to auto-focus on different parts of the scene as subjects move around from one frame to another.

I use (BBF). This way I can set the focus once by pressing the AF button and know it won’t change during the shoot. Unless you’ve specifically set BBF on your camera, it will attempt to auto focus when the shutter button is half-pressed or when the intervalometer triggers an exposure. To avoid this, switch your lens to manual focus mode. What Shutter Speed Should I set? If you set your camera to ‘Movie Mode’ to make a real-time video directly in the camera, you would typically be shooting at a frame rate of 25 fps.

This means that the for each frame in the image cannot be slower than 1/25 second. The exposure wouldn’t otherwise be complete before the next frame in the sequence needed to be shot. There is, however, nothing to stop you from selecting a much faster exposure. This range of exposure time is expanded all the more when you make your video from a series of single photos. The effective shutter speed can approach the selected shooting interval. For example, if you’re taking one photo every ten seconds, the you select for each photo could be anything from eight seconds up to the fastest value your camera affords (light levels permitting).

Note that you can’t set the shutter speed to be exactly ten seconds in this example. We have to give the shutter time to close and open again. For subjects that are moving very slowly (such as a flower opening), the shutter speed is not that critical. The subject is unlikely to be moving to any degree during the exposure. And the camera will almost certainly be on a . Let’s say you’re shooting a night-time movie of the .

Your slowest shutter speed will be limited by the onset of star trails and the fastest shutter speed by the available light and lens aperture. The situation is rather different when shooting cars at a busy interchange during the day. You might have determined that you need to take one photo of the interchange every five seconds and want to know the best shutter speed to use. Theoretically, your shutter speed could be anything from say 1/4000 sec to as slow as 4 seconds.

What difference will this make to the final video? The answer is largely one of artistic interpretation. What impression are you trying to convey? If each exposure is relatively fast (say 1/1000 sec), then your video will essentially comprise a series of still photos of cars. When viewed individually, they’ll look like they’re all stationary. Viewed in sequence, they will appear to jump from one position to another in a very unnatural manner.

If you were really watching a video of a morning commute at 200 mph, you’d expect each frame to show at least some . For a more fluid fast motion effect, reduce the shutter speed to say 1/15 sec or even slower. You can see the effect of changing the shutter speed for a subject moving at the same rate in the header image.

You might find that you can’t achieve a slow enough shutter speed for the effect you want to achieve. This often happens when shooting in bright sunlight.

If you do run into this problem, invest in a This will cut down the light by several stops and allow you to use a slower shutter speed. We also have a great article on using a ND filter to remove people from long exposure shots which you can check . If you’re after some inspiration for time-lapse photography subject ideas, check out our tips on or for a start! We also have a great tutorial on how to create a .

A note from Josh, ExpertPhotography's Photographer-In-Chief: Thank you for reading... if you want to capture breathtaking images, without the frustration of a complicated camera.

It's my training video that will walk you how to use your camera's functions in just 10 minutes - for free! I also offer video courses and ebooks covering the following subjects: • • • • • You could be just a few days away from finally understanding how to use your camera to take great photos! Thanks again for reading our articles!

David Baxter Dave is a photographer and writer based in Oxfordshire, England. He has a science and engineering background and has been taking photographs for over 40 years. His broad experience includes computer graphics, image processing, studio, landscape, macro, architectural, and panoramic photography. He is an Adobe Certified Expert in Photoshop Lightroom and has published numerous technical articles for a Canon based photography magazine.

He now runs photography workshops in Oxfordshire and is currently working on a new Lightroom book.


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