Best single coil neck pickup for strat

best single coil neck pickup for strat

Take your Strat tone to the next level with brand new PUPs.

best single coil neck pickup for strat

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Tech experts from Seymour Duncan are regularly on this forum, and are clearly labeled as employees of Seymour Duncan. They are here to help. Hi guys Stratocaster Neck Single Coil vs Telecaster Neck singlecoil Which do you prefer in playing clean, dirty and with effects. 1) For you, whats the main difference in tone between a Tele Neck Singlecoil vs Strat neck single coil.

2) Is the Tele neck singlecoil the same as a Strat neck Singlecoil, but the tele neck SC has a metal cover, which may effect the high frequencies, much like the effect of Metal Covers in some Humbucker pickups, 3) Anyone tried to put a Tele SC on a Strat and Vice Versa Thanks for the replies.

Tele's are generally wound hotter (stock pickup that is). I think they both have the same baseplate dimensions so you should be able to swap them easily. I'm not sure what the look is like under a chrome cover, you would have to do some wax removal I'd guess. You could probably get a tele neck strength p/u with one of the the antiquity texas hot pups but with the right look too. Hi guys Stratocaster Neck Single Coil vs Telecaster Neck singlecoil Which do you prefer in playing clean, dirty and with effects.

1) For you, whats the main difference in tone between a Tele Neck Singlecoil vs Strat neck single coil. 2) Is the Tele neck singlecoil the same as a Strat neck Singlecoil, but the tele neck SC has a metal cover, which may effect the high frequencies, much like the effect of Metal Covers in some Humbucker pickups, 3) Anyone tried to put a Tele SC on a Strat and Vice Versa Thanks for the replies.1) To me, a strat neck pickup is deep and clear.

The Tele neck seems more muffled. These are just generalities as tone will vary with different makes & models. 2) The tele neck isn't quite as long as a strat pickup.

The metal cover does affect the highs in my experience. 3) I currently have a surfer strat neck pickup in my telecaster and I LOVE it. I actually use the neck pickup now! I didn't vote because I like both in different situations. A good Tele neck pickup, to me, is open, yet really warm and can even have a smokey tone to it but not muffled. A Strat neck pickup, OTOH, tends to naturally be open due to not having a cover. Sometimes it's the warmth that's hard to attain.

We have to remember though, that the Stratocaster, when developed in 1954, was made as an improvement over the Telecaster. When Leo added the neck pickup the the early Esquire and made the Broadcaster, my thought is that he (or George Fullerton) grabbed the closest thing that would work.

Then the Strat pickup was invented. But why didn't Leo put the "improved" pickup (Strat pickup) in the neck of a Telecaster? I have no idea..... im going to talk about the classic fender tele/strat pups here the tele pup is a smaller bobbin set and uses #43 plain enamel wire and is typically around 8k or so. the strat pup uses #42 formvar wire and is some where near 6.5k give or take i hate most tele neck pups. to me they sound weak, muffled and dull where as a good strat neck pup is a clear open sound.

tele neck pups have their place, just not in any of my guitars I think that Strat neck pickups can come out boomy in hardtails such as a Tele.

They mix better with a trem guitar. I think the only one I liked in a hardtail was the YJM. The Tele neck pickup seems more like a "mix-in" thing that you use together with the bridge pickup.

IMHO, if you want to play the neck pickup a lot you need a trem block or an SG, or play Jazz. Well it depends on the pickup. I've had Strat neck pups that sounded "Eh" but the CS '69 is sublime. I've got Lace Hot Golds in in now and the neck sings. All in the same JV Sig Strat. As for Teles, most are darker and less open sounding than Strat necks, but, I have a CS Nocaster set and that neck pup is sweet.

It's my favorite neck pickup of any type. i find a lighter wind works best for strat pups in single cutaway hardtails, say 5.8k to 6k rather than 6.4k to 6.6k for a single trem cutaway guitar That's almost exactly what I use in my Tele: a 5% underwound Fralin Vintage Hot Strat neck pickup that measures 5.7K. I had an Antiquity Surf in there but it had to much push. (Love them in my Strat tho!) The Fralin, which I intentionally ordered 5% underwound, combines better with the Jerry Donahue bridge pickup I use in that guitar.

I like the bridge pickup to dominate just a little when the two pickups are combined in a Tele. I guess in my experiences I find that only antiquities, lollars, fralins, etc really make strat/tele pickups that are worth listening to.

I am honestly disapointed with a lot of strat/tele pickups. I have a set of Lollar tweed strat pickups and a set of Fralin tele pickups (2% overwound neck and 5% overwound bridge) and the difference between these and the stock pickups and the various Fender, GFS, Dimarzio, and standard Duncans is staggering.

Maybe that was just my experience but don't hate on the tele neck position til you try one of the boutiques.

I guess for me an ideal tele would probably be a strat neck and an overwound tele bridge, possibly a P90 or MH in the neck instead.


best single coil neck pickup for strat

best single coil neck pickup for strat - Stratâ„¢ Single Coil Pickups


best single coil neck pickup for strat

I've been looking for an upgrade for my Mexican Strat stock pickups... Like the way my Strat sound but for the music I'm playing, I feel that I could get better using other pickups I was considering Fender CS 69 pickups paired with an SSL-5 bridge pickup (Gilmour influenced here).

What are you guys thoughts and opinions and what are your favourite Single Coil Pickups for Strats Fender Standard Stratocaster MIM 2011 with David Gilmour Neck Pickup Switch Mod Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro 2015 with Peter Green Mod 1997 Orville Les Paul Standard well it really depends on what you want.

for starters giving us an idea of what music you are looking to cover would help. with Gilmour it depends on what era you are referring to as he has gone through a few pickups. stock pups in MIMs are ceramic which tend to be a little hotter than older strat pickups.

if you are looking for the vintage strat chime than alnico pickups are what you want. there are tons of them though so a better idea of what you are after would help. I like the stock Fat 50's my AmSt came with. Lots out there these days to choose from depending on goals. Gilmour's CS-Strat has SSL-5 bridge, Custom wound middle and a Fat 50's neck. The SSL-5 is a good beefed up bridge pup (imo). Duncans SSL-1's are a nice all around vintage vibed set, guys Frusciante use them.

I guess it's all up to how far away you want to get from the classic alnico strat tone. The pickups have serve me very well for the past few years I owned them. But the sound I'm going for; something more chimer and a warmer sound, would fit better changing pickups. Come on... Who doesn't know changing pickup won't make you a better player LOL.

For my strat I'm aiming for the On An Island tour -esk sound... Really love the fatness just oozing out from the strat. The stock pups sounds good for strat but if i'm aiming for the fatness sound, it makes more sense to change the stock pickups. Fender Standard Stratocaster MIM 2011 with David Gilmour Neck Pickup Switch Mod Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro 2015 with Peter Green Mod 1997 Orville Les Paul Standard I have to ask - through what amp?

Guitars: Ibanez RG1570 Prestige Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz) Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85) ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59) ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60) Fender MIM Strat Amps: Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212 Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio Marshall Mini Silver Jubilee 2525C Peavey ReValver Amp Sims TOOOO many T.C.

Electronic Pedals. . . look into this: i decided to try it on my strat before i swapped pickups, and i am glad i did. really woke it up, and gave me a ton of options.

overall simple install, and $60 is cheaper than ONE pickup. my signature has a link about it on my blog if you are interested. if you don't get the preamp, i would FOR SURE get a TBX thingy. they are pretty cool. WTLT 2014 GG&A. 2018 EG. ***Trashed's Gear*** Splawn Promod KT88 METAL RIG Resentments and Rambling from a Guitar Junkie ---> Caveman Thoughts at 1am The Musical Remarks of a Nordic Caveman ------> something like these [url="(Invalid video video code)] [url="(Invalid video video code)] For Echoes it'll be the 1st solo after the verses and the ending jam The 'Eric Clapton' mid boost thing.

From what I've heard, if i don't get noiseless pickup for those, it could get quite noisy especially if you drive it. Orange Crush 20 though I'm looking to upgrade to a Bassbreaker 15 Fender Standard Stratocaster MIM 2011 with David Gilmour Neck Pickup Switch Mod Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro 2015 with Peter Green Mod 1997 Orville Les Paul Standard I have a Strat with a set of Andersen M-Series pickups.

It has a bit more of a midrange quality, and can definitely do the Gilmour sound. However reviled due to their noiselessness, though, I find the Fishman Fluence pickups in one of my other Strats can span the widest variety of tones. They have a treble boost option that I wired to a switch, instead of choosing permanently one way or the other. Very nice and versatile pickups.

Parker Fly Deluxe Various Strats Chute CC-04 (higher gain model, originally custom built for Jeff Martin) PRS Sweet 16 1x12 combo Sewell Texaplex 25 combo 1958 National lap steel Eastman El Rey 1 Vulcan Nice to hear about someone's personal,experiences with the Fluence pickups. More to tell? Well, not much to say except I really like them. I have tried Kinman and Lace, and neither nailed the Hendrix clean tone and various others quite like the Fishmans. Parker Fly Deluxe Various Strats Chute CC-04 (higher gain model, originally custom built for Jeff Martin) PRS Sweet 16 1x12 combo Sewell Texaplex 25 combo 1958 National lap steel Eastman El Rey 1 Would like to try out those pickups but sadly in the country I lived, the guitar stores here mostly stock Seymour Duncan, Dimarzio, Fender and Gibson.

To a certain extend shur, EMGs and Bareknuckle... Getting pickups online can get quite expensive so yea... Fender Standard Stratocaster MIM 2011 with David Gilmour Neck Pickup Switch Mod Epiphone Les Paul Standard PlusTop Pro 2015 with Peter Green Mod 1997 Orville Les Paul Standard Well, think of it as an investment in your tone.

I've never bought pickups in a store, only online: the ones I've wanted were never available locally, and I live in a big American city. Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.” Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking! Log off and play yer guitar! Strap on, tune up, rock out!

Lose the Crush and find your tone. New PUs won't take you where you want to go but the right amp will. The right amp will likely affect your tone 30%. The right PUs might affect your tone 3%. Time to refocus your search.

Bassbreaker AC15 Supersonic Super Champ "Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis "Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan Guthrie on tone: Vince Gill on guitar tone:


best single coil neck pickup for strat

String effect on a single coil (electric guitar). The coil is connected to a multimeter that indicates the voltage changes when the string moves.

This signal is normally sent to an amplifier. A single coil pickup is a type of magnetic , or , for the and the . It electromagnetically converts the vibration of the strings to an electric signal. Single coil pickups are one of the two most popular designs, along with dual-coil or "" pickups. Sketch of Rickenbacker "frying pan" lap steel guitar from 1934 patent application In the mid-1920s , a Los Angeles, California guitarist, began experimentation with electric amplification of the guitar.

Originally using a phonograph pickup assembly, Beauchamp began testing many different combinations of coils and magnets hoping to create the first electromagnetic guitar pickup.

He wound his earliest coils using a motor out of a washing machine, later on switching to a sewing machine motor, and eventually using single coiled magnets. Beauchamp was backed in his efforts by , an engineer and wealthy owner of a successful tool and die business. Beauchamp eventually produced the first successful single coil pickup. The pickup consisted of two massive "U" shaped magnets and one coil and was known as the "". The two horseshoe-shaped magnets surrounded the strings that passed over a single core plate (or blade) in the center of the coil.

Gibson Main article: The introduced the "bar pickup" in 1935 for its new line of Hawaiian lap steel guitars. The pickup's basic construction is that of a metal blade inserted through the coil as a shared pole piece for all the strings. A pair of large flat magnets were fastened below the coil assembly. In 1936 Gibson introduced the , its first electric Spanish styled guitar.

The ES-150 was outfitted with the bar pickup. Jazz guitar innovator, , began playing an ES-150 in the late 1930s with the Orchestra. This caused the popularity of the electrified guitar to soar. Due to Christian’s close association with the ES-150 it began being referred to as the “Charlie Christian Model” and Gibson’s now famous bar pickup as the “Charlie Christian pickup” or “CC unit”.

This section does not any . Please help by . Unsourced material may be challenged and . (June 2016) () The P-90 is a single-coil pickup designed by the . These pickups have a large, flat coil with adjustable steel screws as pole pieces, and a pair of flat alnico bar magnets lying under the coil bobbin. The adjustable pole pieces pick up the magnetism from the magnets. Moving the screw closer or further away from the magnet determines signal strength, thus tone as well.

There are two variations of P-90 pickup that differ mainly by mounting options: Gibson P-90 soap bar • Soap bar casing has true rectangular shape and the mounting screws are contained within the coil perimeter, positioned between the pole pieces, between strings 2-3 and 4-5, thus creating irregular and somewhat unusual pattern. Occasionally, they are mistaken for pole pieces; thus, the P-90 is sometimes erroneously said to have eight pole pieces. The "soap bar" nickname most probably comes from its predominantly rectangular shape and proportions resembling a bar of soap, and the fact that the first P-90s on the original Model of 1952 were white.

P90 dog ear • Dog ear is a casing type with extensions at both sides of pickup that somewhat resemble dog's ears. These are extensions of the predominantly rectangular cover that encompass the outlying mounting screws.

Dog-ear P-90 pickups were commonly mounted on Gibson's hollowbody guitars like the and occasionally on solid body models like the . The same pickups were also available on Epiphone models (since Gibson was building Epiphone guitars in the 1950s) and the design is best remembered for its appearance on the hollow body of the mid to late 1960s. The sound of a P-90 is somewhat brighter and more transparent than Gibson's later pickup, and every bit as crisp and snappy as Fender's single-coil pickups despite its high output and big sound.

[ ] Despite its tonal qualities the P-90 fell out of favor with Gibson in the early 1950s as a consequence of guitar players complaining about the amount of hum (noise) it put out. [ ] Gibson employee solved the hum problem by designing a hum-canceling pickup known as a humbucker, it was supposed to sound like a P-90 but in fact has quite a different sound.

[ ] It nevertheless became Gibson's mainstay pickup from that point on. [ ] The P-90 likely did not become as popular for that reason, although many guitarists still prefer the tone of the P-90. [ ] Telecaster design Two pickups on a Telecaster The features two single coils. The neck pickup produces a mellower sound, while the bridge pickup produces an extremely twangy, sharp tone with exaggerated treble response, because the bridge pickup is mounted on a steel plate.

These design elements allow musicians to emulate sounds, making it particularly appropriate for country music. Pickups are selected with a three-position switch, and two wiring schemes exist: • Vintage: 1) neck pickup with treble cutoff for a bassier sound; 2) neck pickup only; 3) bridge pickup only.

• Modern: 1) neck pickup only, with no treble cutoff; 2) neck and bridge; 3) bridge pickup only. The Fender Esquire has a variation to the Vintage wiring scheme by using the scheme on a single pickup.

This gives a treble cutoff in the first position, normal in the middle position, and a tone control cutoff in the third position. Stratocaster design Stratocaster pickups, viewed along the neck profile. Note that the poles are of different heights.

The traditional design guitar features three single coils. The guitarist can control which pickup or combination of pickups are selected with a lever . The pickup positions are usually referred to as the , middle and pickups based on their proximity to those parts of the instrument.

The neck pickup typically has the greatest output, with the most mid-range and bass response, whereas the bridge pickup has the greatest treble response, with a slight twang to it. The sound of the middle pickup is similar to that of the neck pickup, albeit with slightly less bass and more treble. However many players, such as , find it somewhat of an obstruction to the picking hand, so loosen the mounting screws such that it lies flush with the pickguard. Modern Stratocasters have five-position pickup selector switch.

Positions 1, 3 and 5 activate only one pickup (bridge, middle or neck respectively), while positions 2 and 4 activate a combination of two pickups (bridge and middle, or middle and neck, respectively). Some pickup sets have a reverse wound and reverse polarity middle pickup that when in combination with the normal bridge or neck pickups will cancel electromagnetic interference (noise/hum) which single coil pickups suffer badly from. The sonic effect of positions 2 and 4 is sometimes referred to as a "quack" or "notch positions", and some guitar notation includes directions to use these pickup combinations.

One example is "" by which is played in position 2 (bridge and middle). Two types of noise afflict magnetic guitar pickups. Hum is caused by magnetic fields due to currents in electrical equipment, whereas buzz is propagated as radio transmissions and sounds more like static.

The sources of buzz are many, but one example is an AC power tool with a brush motor. The makes and breaks electrical contact with the commutator segment several thousand times a second at variable frequency dependent on load thus causing . were awarded 5 or more US patents beginning circa 1996 for innovative design concerned with hum canceling single pole pickups.

Kinman at first concentrated on particularly the Fender type single coil pickup and in 2009 the P-90 pickup. One of the most important elements of Kinman's patents is the use of iron in the core of the noise sensing coil.

This was absolutely novel in 1996 and without the presence of iron to boost the efficiency of the noise sensing coil differential coil technology would not have been possible. Vertical differential coil technique is also described in Kinman's US Patents and with priority date of March 1996.

After 1998 and also began using iron and differential winding techniques in the noise sensing coils in some of their products. Over the years Kinman has improved and refined their designs to a point where the popular consensus is the sound of some models is indistinguishable from noisy single coils.

Kinman also manufactures noiseless and Telecaster pickups under US Patent Ilitch Electronics also patented their revolutionary hum-canceling technology which has been developed for aftermarket guitars (Strats, Teles, Gibson Les Pauls and many others).

The search for an acceptable solution to mains hum gained new impetus around 1995 as guitar players became increasingly intolerant of degraded stacked single-coil sound.

Fender was researching new techniques to solve the loss of tone around that time and eventually came out with their design circa 1998. "Lipstick"-style single coil pickups on a guitar • Rickenbacker pickups (including the original 1930s "horseshoe" pickup as used in lap steel and solidbody upright basses, and later 6 string electric guitars, pedal steels, and electric bass guitars; also the "Toaster" and "Hi-Gain") • Gibson bar pickup (1935) — later called the (1938) • Gibson (1946) • Fender Telecaster, Stratocaster, Jazzmaster, Jaguar, and other pickups • Danelectro • Gretsch pickups (including the "HiLoTron") • pickups (found on various '50s and '60s guitars by various manufacturers including Gretsch, Guild, Epiphone, Martin, Kustom, Harmony, Regal, Premier, Silvertone, and others; the trade name is now owned by Fender; single coil models including the 200 aka Dynasonic, 2K, and 2000, "mustache", various "gold foil" types, and many clip on, rail, or screw mount pickups designed for acoustic guitars and other instruments).

The Fender "Tele-Sonic" featured large DeArmond single-coils. • Valco single-coil pickups by Ralph Keller (1954) can be found in Airline, Supro, National, English Electronics, Custom Kraft, and a few Gretsch models of guitar from the '50s, '60s, and '70s. The majority of these pickups maintain the physical appearance of a larger, double coil humbucker pickup. Although consisting of a single coil, the pickup contains a second, off-set magnet which cancels hum. Early variations on the Valco-made over-strings "horseshoe" pickup can be found on a number of similarly branded , such as Oahu.

• Epiphone "New York" pickups • pickups (1987) • Batey, Rick (2003). The American Blues Guitar. . . • Duchossoir, A. R. (1998). Gibson Electrics: The Classic Years. . . • Millard, Andre (2004). The Electric Guitar: A History of an American Icon. . . • Hirst, Tom (2003). Electric Guitar Construction. . . • Smith, Richard R. (1987). The History of Rickenbacker Guitars.

Centerstream Publications. pp. 9–14. . • Fjestad, Zachary R. (2005). Blue Book of Electric Guitars. Blue Book Publications, Inc. p. 397. .


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