Best new reality tv shows of all time list 2018

best new reality tv shows of all time list 2018

Everyone loves a good reality show, and the best of 2018 have not been disappointing. While plenty of long-running shows premiered new seasons in '18, this list of reality series features only the best new shows of 2018, and some of the best current reality .

best new reality tv shows of all time list 2018

March brings the start of spring, the loss of an hour, basketball madness, and your quarterly list of reality TV show debut dates, which this year includes the return of both American Idol and Jersey Shore.

This reality show schedule lists debut dates and time slots for new and returning reality TV shows that debut this spring (and beyond). I update it constantly throughout the quarter with officially announced days and times and brief descriptions of each show; text in quotation marks is from that show’s official network press releases or materials.

Times are ET/PT; because TV networks change their schedules and repeat episodes, check your guide or other TV listings. For all the reality shows that premiered before March 1, 2018, see the . If you have any updates, additions, or corrections, please Thanks! March 2018 • American Ninja Warrior: Ninja vs. Ninja (USA Network, March 1, Thursdays at 9). The series formerly known as Team Ninja Warrior returns and “pits top ninjas … against each other in a nail-biting head-to-head competition” • Girls Incarcerated: Young and Locked Up (Netflix, March 2).

“Fights, friendships, dating, rules. Teenage life is full of drama. But behind bars, the stakes are so much higher.” • Flint Town (Netflix, March 2).

“Over a two-year period, filmmakers embedded with cops in Flint, Michigan, reveal a department grappling with volatile issues in untenable conditions.” • MasterChef Junior (Fox, March 2, Fridays at 8). Season six of the competition will bring back Joe Bastianich to judge alongside Gordon Ramsay and Christina Tosi.

• Bring It! (Lifetime, March 2, Fridays at 9). “Miss D is focusing on the future… with a vengeance. But could this be her last season in Jackson?” • Bridezillas (WE tv, March 2, Fridays at 10).

The return of the series, which “continues to celebrate the craziest, most over-the-top brides wreaking wedding day hell with epic meltdowns, family feuds and social media wars” • Laurieann Gibson: Beyond the Spotlight (Lifetime, March 2, Fridays at 10).

A “look into Laurieann’s process as she shapes and steers the creative narrative of her clients that include Sean ‘Puffy’ Combs, Fantasia Barrino, Tamar Braxton, French Montana and many more” • Iyanla: Fix My Life (OWN, March 3, Saturdays at 9). Iyanla works with people including with Philando Castile’s fiancée Diamond Reynolds, who streamed his murder by a police officer on Facebook, and Love & Hip Hop: Hollywood’s Hazel Z, who was fired after a homophobic rant on social media. • Hear Me, Love Me, See Me (TLC, March 3, Saturdays at 10).

“an eligible bachelorette will meet three bachelors, using only POV cameras strapped to the men’s chests” • Buyers Bootcamp with Scott McGillivray (DIY, March 3, Saturdays at 10). Scott “helps upgrade a property with help from the amateur flippers and, once the house sells, everyone cashes in and splits the profits” • Top Gear (BBC America, March 3 at 10:30, then Sundays at 8).

Matt LeBlanc, Chris Harris and Rory Reid return as hosts of the British version of the long-running car enthusiast series. • Relative Race (BYUtv, March 4, Sundays at 9). “This original family history-based competition reality show follows four dynamic duo teams as they race across the U.S. in search of long lost relatives, armed with only paper maps, a rental car and a flip phone.” • Shifting Gears with Aaron Kaufman (Discovery, March 5, Mondays at 10).

“Fast N’ Loud star Aaron Kaufman is back, and this time, he’s the boss” • The Curse of Civil War Gold (History, March 6, Tuesdays at 10). Kevin Dykstra seeks Marty Lagina’s help in exploring “a story of national treasure that goes back to the Civil War” • The Men Who Built America: Frontiersmen (History, March 7, Wednesdays at 9).

“tells the stories of the adventurous trailblazers, from Davy Crockett to Lewis and Clark, who set forth across the land to transform us from colonists to revolutionaries to Americans” • Street Outlaws: No Prep Kings (Discovery, March 7, Wednesdays at 9). “32 of the biggest names in no prep racing—including Street Outlaws favorites, as well as newcomers—will duke it out to become the ultimate ‘no prep winner’ and receive a $40,000 first place purse” • My 600-LB Life: Skin Tight (TLC, March 7, Wednesdays at 10).

“Dr. Nowzaradan returns with other top plastic surgeons across the country to work with subjects looking to undergo a full-body transformation through skin removal surgery” • Truck Night in America (History, March 8, Thursdays at 10). “50 truck owners from across the United States compete in grueling challenges that test their ingenuity and driving ability” • Nailed It! (Netflix, March 9).

“Home bakers with a terrible track record take a crack at re-creating edible masterpieces for a $10,000 prize. It’s part reality contest, part hot mess.” • Marriage Boot Camp: Reality Stars Family Edition (WE tv, March 9, Fridays at 9). “Four famously dysfunctional families … embark on an 8-day journey of extreme relationship therapy to salvage their toxic relationships” • The Zoo (Animal Planet, March 10, Saturdays at 9).

“the first-ever series to go behind the scenes at the world-famous Bronx Zoo” • Rocky Mountain Animal Rescue (NatGeo WILD, March 10, Saturdays at 10). The “staff at the Humane Society of the Pikes Peak Region risk their lives and give their hearts to save all animals big and small” • (ABC, March 11, Sundays at 8). The singing competition returns on a new network.

• How Close Can I Beach? (HGTV, March 11, Sundays at 8:30). “[Follows] buyers who tour coastal towns in hopes of finding the perfect beachside home” • Bar Rescue (Paramount, March 11, Sundays at 10). Jon Taffer screams and creates drama as he allegedly helps failing bars. • American Dynasties: The Kennedys (CNN, March 11, Sundays at 9). “takes viewers behind the public image of America’s ‘First Family,’ revealing how personal relationships within the Kennedy dynasty helped shape national and global events” • Wicked Tuna (National Geographic, March 11, Sundays at 9).

“a new season dawns and with it, new opportunities to settle old scores, forge fresh beginnings and bring in lucrative paychecks” • Naked and Afraid (Discovery, March 11, Sundays at 10). “For 21 days, two complete strangers are paired together and tasked to survive against the relentless elements of the wild” • Pope: The Most Powerful Man in History (CNN, March 11, Sundays at 10).

“goes inside the Vatican to reveal the true power held by popes throughout the ages” • The Riveras (Universo, March 11, Sundays at 10). “the only English-language reality [show] about a Hispanic family in the U.S.” follows “he lives of the children of the late Regional Mexican music legend, Jenni Rivera as they take on life’s challenges by supporting each other” • The Supervet (NatGeo WILD, March 11, Sundays at 10).

Follows the staff of “Fitzpatrick Referrals in Surrey, England,” which “is one of the biggest and best veterinary hospitals in the world” • Spring Baking Championship (Food Network, March 12, Mondays at 9). “10 of the best bakers in the country vie for the title of Spring Baking Champion and the $50,000 prize” • Fast N’ Loud (Discovery, March 12, Mondays at 9).

“Hot rod hunter Richard Rawlings and his Gas Monkey crew are back for another wild ride” • Teen Mom: Young and Pregnant (MTV, March 12, Mondays at 10). “the diverse stories and backgrounds of five new young women as they navigate the complexities of being a Gen Z mother” • Terrace House: Opening New Doors (Netflix, March 13).

“ A group of young people—including a chef, a snowboarder and an ice hockey player—gather in the Karuizawa woods while pursuing their dreams” • Wild Wild Country (Netflix, March 13). “When a controversial cult leader builds a utopian city in the Oregon desert, conflict with the locals escalates into a national scandal.

A true story.” • Forged in Fire (History, March 13, Tuesdays at 9). A competition on which “world-class bladesmiths competing to create history’s most iconic edged weapons” • The Zimmern List (Travel Channel, March 13, Tuesdays at 9). Andrew “Zimmern is sharing his personal recommendations on the food and places where he most loves to eat” • The Book of John Gray (OWN, March 13, Tuesdays at 10).

“Pastor John Gray is back, preaching at one of the largest churches in America by night, while ministering one-on-one to those in great need of his inspiring words by day.” • The Tattoo Shop (Facebook Watch, March 15, Thursdays). “follows renowned tattoo artists Ami James (Miami Ink, NY Ink), Chris Nunez (Ink Master, Miami Ink), Chris Garver (Miami Ink), Darren Brass (Miami Ink) and Tommy Montoya (NY Ink), as they open their new tattoo shop, Liberty City Tattoo, in Wynwood Miami.” • Flip or Flop Vegas (HGTV, March 15, Thursdays at 9).

“ Bristol, a builder, and Aubrey, a real estate agent and designer, … transform rundown desert properties into beautiful family homes” • The Secret Life of Kids (USA, March 16, Fridays at 9). “an intimate look at how children navigate topics such as love, compassion, rejection, honesty and conflict” • Christiane Amanpour: Sex & Love Around the World (CNN, March 17, Saturdays at 10).

Amanpour travels the world to see how “women and men are all pushing the boundaries on sexual satisfaction, consent, and connection” • Little Big Shots (NBC, March 18 at 7, then Sundays at 8). “talented and unique kids from all over the U.S. and the world” show off their talents and talk to Steve Harvey • Genius Junior (NBC, March 18, Sundays at 9).

“Neil Patrick Harris hosts an exciting new game show that celebrates the smartest kids in America” • Guy’s Grocery Games: DDD All-Star Tournament (Food Network, March 18, Sundays at 9).

“the best chefs from Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives, who have also rocked Guy’s Grocery Games, … compete in an epic four-episode tournament” • Dr. K’s Exotic Animal ER (NatGeo WILD, March 18, Sundays at 9). “Dr. Susan Kelleher treats a dynamic array of patients ranging from kangaroos, to monkeys, birds, rabbits, pigs, fish” • Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta (VH1, March 19, Mondays at 8). Erica Mena returns to the cast for the show’s seventh season. • Mysteries of the Abandoned (Science, March 20, Tuesdays at 9).

“stories behind some of the world’s most amazing engineering wonders, why they were built, and why they were eventually left to crumble” • Adam Ruins Everything (truTV, March 20, Tuesdays at 10:30). Adam Conover’s series returns in animated form for six episodes “that take on well-known historical topics and reveal the surprising truths and unsung heroes behind the history we’ve been taught.” • Love at First Flight (Lifetime, March 20, Tuesdays at 10).

Strangers meet and take “a romantic (and stressful) journey across North America—with the chance to get married at the airport immediately after their final flight lands.” • Little Women: LA (Lifetime, March 21, Wednesdays at 9).

“The ladies are looking to take on new adventures, pushing boundaries, tackling prejudices against dwarfism and conquering their own fears.” • Cheap Eats (Cooking Channel, March 21, Wednesdays at 10). “Ali Khan, author of the blog Bang for Your Burger Buck, has 12 hours and only 35 bucks to find the best deals for breakfast, lunch, a snack and dinner” • (VH1, March 22, Thursdays at 8).

Season 10 of the competition will have 90-minute episodes and be followed by Untucked (VH1, March 22, Thursdays at 9:30). • Braxton Family Values (WE tv, March 22, Thursdays at 9). The sixth season of the show following the Braxton family. • Hustle & Soul (WE tv, March 22, Thursdays at 10). “Chef Lawrence Page is back and has big plans to expand the Pink Tea Cup brand” • Teyana & Iman (VH1, March 26, Mondays at 9). “an intimate look into newlyweds Teyana Taylor, a trend-setting singer, dancer, model and actress, and Iman Shumpert, a professional athlete, musician, dedicated father and loving husband” • One Strange Rock (National Geographic Channel, March 26, Mondays at 10).

“a mind-bending, thrilling journey that explores the fragility and wonder of planet Earth, one of the most peculiar, unique places in the entire universe” • Food Exposed with Nelufar Hedayat (Fusion, March 27, Tuesdays at 8).

“an eight-part docuseries exploring the global food industry” • Marcia Clark Investigates The First 48 (A&E, March 29, Thursdays at 9). “delves into some of America’s most shocking crimes that have remained unsolved or ended with controversial outcomes” • Grace vs. Abrams (A&E, March 29, Thursdays at 11). Nancy Grace and Dan Abrams “debate infamous crimes and legal cases” • Gold Rush: Parker’s Trail (Discovery, March 30, Fridays at 9). “ Parker and his crew of friends are about to head deep into the treacherous jungles of Guyana, South America, to chase a 21st century gold rush at the site of the legendary El Dorado.” • Bering Sea Gold (Discovery, March 30, Fridays at 10).

“summer mining season brings the heat and the highest gold totals in series history” April 2018 • In Ice Cold Blood (Oxygen, April 1, Sundays at 7). Ice-T hosts a show that “spotlights shocking true stories involving sex, money, murder—or a fatal cocktail of all three.” • Your Husband Is Cheating On Us (Bravo, April 1 at 9, then Fridays at 8).

“follows mega-producer JD Lawrence and his top-tier theater company through all the five-star action and juicy drama that comes with launching a new stage production” • The Real Housewives of Potomac (Bravo, April 1 at 10, then Sundays at 8).

“This season the ladies are dealing with the high and lows of friendships, and marriages are being challenged.” • Flipping Virgins (HGTV, April 2, Mondays at 9).

“Real estate expert Egypt Sherrod is back to support more house-flipping newcomers” • Vegas Cakes (Food Network, April 2, Mondays at 10). The staff of Freed’s Bakery “entertain and wow their clients with exquisite and unique creations” • Little People, Big World (TLC, April 3, Tuesdays at 9). The Roloffs return, including an episode “featuring the birth of Jeremy and Audrey’s baby girl, Ember Jean Roloff” • My Little Life (TLC, April 3, Tuesdays at 10). Follows “five little people in their 20s and early 30s as they set out on a journey … to pursue their dreams and find love in a big world” • Good Bones (HGTV, April 3, Tuesdays at 10).

“mother/daughter duo Mina Starsiak and Karen E Laine tackle bigger home renovations and take on riskier house flips in the third season” • The Real Housewives of New York City (Bravo, April 4, Wednesdays at 9).

“an epic 10th anniversary season of humor, healing and heartbreaks” • Iron Chef Gauntlet (Food Network, April 4, Wednesdays at 9). The series that turned Top Chef Stephanie Izard into an Iron Chef returns as “seven rising stars battling for the chance to gain the only culinary title that matters: Iron Chef” • Jersey Shore Family Vacation (MTV, April 5, Thursdays at 8).

“Deena Nicole Cortese, Paul ‘Pauly D’ Delvecchio,” Jenni ‘JWOWW’ Farley, Vinny Guadagnino, Ronnie Ortiz-Magro, Nicole ‘Snooki’ Polizzi and Mike ‘The Situation’ Sorrentino who reunite in Miami” • Southern Charm (Bravo, April 5, Thursdays at 9). “relationships old and new are tested as the women are turning the good old boys club on its head” • Fastest Car (Netflix, April 6). “The drivers of exotic supercars put their street cred on the line against deceptively fast sleeper cars built and modified by true gearheads.” • Vice (HBO, April 6, Fridays at 11).

The documentary series will feature “under-covered global stories with exclusive reports from Iraq, Russia, the Central African Republic and China” and the “domestic issues dividing the nation, providing in-depth, trusted reporting on the major debates surrounding gun laws, immigration, economics, education, civil rights and America’s place in the world.” • (TLC, April 7, Saturdays at 9).

The original home re-decoration series returns with its original team and new designers. • Buckeye Bottoms (NatGeo WILD, April 7, Saturdays at 9). Dr. Buckeye Bottoms and his dog Kevin “put hundreds of miles on Hawaii’s back roads delivering life saving treatment to Hawaii’s sick animals” • Nate and Jeremiah By Design (TLC, April 7, Saturdays at 10).

“follows renowned interior designers and husbands Nate Berkus and Jeremiah Brent as they help distressed homeowners turn renovation failures into dream homes, while balancing work and family with their adorable daughter Poppy” • Long Island Medium (TLC, April 8, Sundays at 8). “Theresa continues to share her gift of healing and comfort and connecting people with those who have departed, all-the-while searching for her own answers in her personal life.” • Rock & Roll Road Trip With Sammy Hagar (AXS, April 8, Sundays at 9).

“Sammy Hagar cruises across the country for even more candid conversations and unforgettable jam sessions with some of music’s biggest names” • Real Money (AXS, April 8, Sundays at 9:30).

“captures the daily lives of the Money Clan—which includes Eddie; Laurie, his wife of over 30 years; their five kids, Zach, Joe, Jesse, Dez, and Julian; and eight pets” • Deadly Intelligence (Science, April 8, Sundays at 10). “explores the suspicious deaths of scientific geniuses to determine if their demises were unfortunate coincidences or if these gifted minds were murdered for knowing too much” • Big Beach Builds (DIY, April 9, Mondays at 9). Marnie Oursler “revamps rundown beachside properties into stunning dream getaways” • Deadliest Catch (Discovery, April 10, Tuesdays at 9).

Season 14 of the crab fishing series follows “the roughest, toughest and most competitive crab season ever,” according to Discovery. • Fixer Upper: Behind the Design (HGTV, April 10, Sundays at 7:30). A companion series to Chip and Joanna Gaines’ now-concluded show that promises to show the behind-the-scenes of designs and builds. • Wheeler Dealers (Velocity, April 11, Wednesdays at 9).

“automotive valuation expert Mike Brewer and new master mechanic and fabricator Ant Anstead go to work finding, fixing and flipping a wide variety of unique used cars” • America Inside Out With Katie Couric (National Geographic Channel, April 11, Wednesdays at 10). “follows Couric as she travels the country to sit down with the people shaping the most pivotal, evolving, contentious and often confusing topics in American culture today” • Sell It Like Serhant (Bravo, April 11, Wednesdays at 10).

Million Dollar Listing’s Ryan Serhant “answers the call of struggling salespeople across multiple industries who are on the brink of losing their jobs and are desperate for his expertise” • Staten Island Hustle (CNBC, April 11, Wednesdays at 10).

“follows a group of animated friends and businessmen from Staten Island who have yet to come up with an idea or product too far-fetched for them to invest in” • Chef’s Table: Pastry (Netflix, April 13). A new season of the documentary series follows pastry chefs. • Wyatt Cenac’s Problem Areas (HBO, April 13, Fridays at 11:30). Cenac travels “around the country, from suburban Minneapolis to downtown Cincinnati to rural Texas, as he investigates systemic issues from his unique perspective” • The Circus (Showtime, April 15, Sundays at 8).

John Heilemann, Mark McKinnon, and Alex Wagner examine “American politics, society, and culture, capturing key moments, featuring interviews with newsmakers, and offering critical analysis of the stories driving the non-stop news cycle.” • Worst Cooks in America: Celebrity Edition (Food Network, April 15, Sundays at 9).

Catherine Bach, Maria Bamford, Nolan Gould, La Toya Jackson, Oscar Nunez, Bronson Pinchot and Ian Ziering compete in the cooking competition. • Southern Charm New Orleans (Bravo, April 15, Sundays at 9). “follow[s] an elite circle of friends who were born into prominent families and live a New Orleans’ lifestyle of exclusive parties” • Breaking Homicide (Investigation Discovery, April 15, Sundays at 9).

Big Brother winner and “former Rhode Island Police Sergeant Derrick Levasseur and forensic psychologist Kris Mohandie … answer the pleas of desperate families seeking help investigating the unsolved murders of their loved ones” • Snoop Dogg Presents The Joker’s Wild (TBS, April 15, Sundays at 10).

The classic game show that’s “[s]et in [Snoop’s] very own casino” with “an oversized slot machine, giant dice and playing cards” • Drop the Mic (TBS, April 15, Sundays at 10:30). “pits celebrities from the worlds of entertainment, music, sports and pop culture against each other in a rap battle royale” • Civilizations (PBS, April 17, Tuesdays at 8).

“tells the story of art from the dawn of human history to the present day” • Holmes: Next Generation (DIY, April 17, Tuesdays at 9). Mike Holmes “teams up with his daughter Sherry and son Mike Jr., who also are home renovation experts, to rescue homeowners from do-it-yourself projects gone wrong” • The Challenge: Champs vs.

Stars (MTV, April 17, Tuesdays at 10). 10 celebrities and 10 “fan-favorite champions from past Challenge” will be combined into two teams and “face off in weekly eliminations, until one team will prove they are the ultimate Challenge MVP.” • Forged in Fire: Knife or Death (History, April 17, Tuesdays at 10). “The nation’s top bladesmiths, martial artists and knife experts slice, stab and chop their way through some of the most daunting obstacle courses ever seen” • Last Outpost (Discovery, April 17, Tuesdays at 10).

“Backcountry builders Clint Greathouse and Todd Anderson create one-of-a-kind builds, using nothing but recycled parts, out-of-the box creativity, and sheer determination.” • Stone House Revival (DIY, April 18, Wednesdays at 9). Jeff Devlin “will refurbish more centuries-old homes in Bucks County, Pennsylvania” • The Wine Show (Ovation, April 18, Wednesdays at 10).

Actors Matthew Goode and Matthew Rhys learn about and try new wines. • Jay Leno’s Garage (CNBC, April 19, Thursdays at 10). Jay Leno is again “putting some of the world’s most amazing vehicles through their paces” and talking to “fellow car enthusiasts from who he’ll discover the touching, hilarious and sometimes hard to believe stories” • Dope (Netflix, April 20).

Season two of the series “[f]ilmed from the perspectives of dealers, users and the police” that “offers a bracing look at the war on drugs” • NOVA Wonders (PBS, April 25, Wednesdays). “follows remarkable researchers who are tackling the biggest unanswered questions about life and the cosmos, and pushing the boundaries of understanding in ways that could transform our world and the future” • My Partner Knows Best (Lifetime, April 25, Wednesdays at 10).

Jason Biggs and Jenny Mollen host a game show which features couples who “compete in a series of hilarious challenges based on real-life relationship obstacle.” • Rustic Rehab (HGTV, April 26, Thursdays at 11). “ Real estate investors and expert home renovators David and Chenoa Rivera will transform outdated properties near Northern California’s idyllic Sierra Nevada Mountains into beautiful family homes” • Ancient Aliens (History, April 27, Fridays at 9).

“covers various alien-related topics with historic detail, first-hand accounts and interviews with the world’s top scientists, archaeologists and researchers” and “travels to over a dozen countries to explore firsthand signs of ancient alien visitation.” • (ABC, April 30, Mondays at 8).

An abbreviated season featuring a cast of all athletes. • AMC Visionaries: James Cameron’s Story of Science Fiction (AMC, April 30, Mondays at 10). “James Cameron explores science fiction’s roots, futuristic vision and our fascination with its ideas through interviews with A-list storytellers, stars and others” • Dallas Cakes (Food Network, April 30, Mondays at 10:30).

“three outrageously talented bakers conceive, create and deliver incredible, edible works of art using cake, frosting, incredible imagination and skill” May 2018 • Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s (OWN, May 1, Tuesdays at 10). “The fifth and final season” of the series that follows “a family-operated soul food empire.” • Nazi Treasure Hunters (History, May 1, Tuesdays at 10).

Monuments Men author “Robert Edsel, historian James Holland, and investigative journalist Conor Woodman as they travel the world exploring historic sites in search of famed artwork and treasures stolen during the Nazi era” • Misfit Garage (Discovery, May 2, Wednesdays at 9). “follows the crew at Fired Up Garage – Thomas Weeks, Tom Smith, John Klump and Josh Paris – as they set out to prove themselves as the top shop in Texas for custom street rods” • Sticker Shock (Discovery, May 2, Wednesdays at 10.) A team of appraisers “investigate [cars’] history and condition to determine a price tag you won’t see coming” • Comedy Knockout (truTV, May 2, Wednesdays at 11).

“pits comedians against each other in a series of fast-paced challenges” • A Little Help with Carol Burnett (Netflix, May 4). “Comedy icon Carol Burnett returns to TV with a panel of clever kids, who help adults and celebrity guests solve their problems with brutal honesty.” • Drag Race Thailand (, May 4).

“hosts Art Araya In-dra and Pangina Heals search for Thailand’s next Drag superstar” • Naked and Afraid XL (Discovery, May 6, Sundays at 10). “thirteen Naked and Afraid veterans take on the most harrowing survival challenge yet” • Best Baker in America (Food Network, May 7, Mondays at 9). “Scott Conant hosts the competition as bakers from across the country are put to the test in each episode to create elegant and delicious versions of classic baked goods” • Love It or List It (HGTV, May 7, Mondays at 9).

“designer Hilary Farr and real estate expert David Visentin … help homeowners make a difficult decision: love their existing home after Hilary remodels their space or purchase a new house that David finds to better fit the needs of the family.” • Running Wild with Bear Grylls (NBC, May 7, Mondays at 10).

Bear Grylls goes on pre-planned adventures with tennis champion Roger Federer, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Lena Headey, Uzo Aduba, Keri Russell, Don Cheadle, Scott Eastwood, and Derek Hough. • Chrisley Knows Best (USA, May 8, Tuesdays at 10). Season six of the show that “follows the entertaining lives of outspoken patriarch Todd Chrisley and his over-the-top Southern family” • The Cromarties (USA, May 8, Tuesdays at 10:30).

Follows NFL player Antonio Cromartie, his wife Terricka, and their family. • Botched (E!, May 9, Wednesdays at 9). Dr. Terry Dubrow and Dr. Paul Nassif perform “challenging and nearly impossible reconstructive procedures” necessary because of “horrific plastic surgery catastrophes” • Bill Nye Saves the World (Netflix, May 11).

“This season, Nye tackles the truth behind evolution, how climate change will impact foods of the future, if it’s really possible to ‘cheat death,’ the truth behind addiction, what will need to happen to avoid wars starting over water, and what our pets can teach us about being human.” • Evil Genius: the True Story of America’s Most Diabolical Bank Heist (Netflix, May 11).

“This baffling true crime story starts with the grisly death of a pizza man who robs a bank with a bomb around his neck—and gets weirder from there.” • BattleBots (Discovery, May 11, Fridays at 8, repeating on Science, Wednesdays at 9). “the biggest, baddest, strongest, and fastest next-generation robots from all over the world … duke it out for supremacy in the rapidly exploding world of Robot Combat Sports” • Undercover Boss: Celebrity Edition (CBS, May 11, Fridays at 8).

“Celebrities at the top of their chosen fields are going undercover to find talented people and make dreams come true.” • Abuse of Power (Oxygen, May 12, Saturdays at 7). Host Lauren Sivan “will examine the twisted and true stories where people in positions of power and prominence took advantage of their authority to commit heinous acts of crime” • Black Love (OWN, May 12, Saturdays at 10). Black couples—including Sterling K. Brown and Ryan Michelle Bathe; Rev Run and Justine Simmons; Eddie and Taj George; Bart and Starr Scott—share stories about their relationships.

• The Big Fun Crafty Show (Universal Kids, May 14, Mondays at 5:30). “ This competition show puts creative kids to the test as they tackle a fun, imaginative crafting challenge” • Below Deck Mediterranean (Bravo, May 15, Tuesdays at 9). For season three, “ Captain Sandy Yawn is once again at the helm of the 178″ Talisman Maiton, the largest superyacht in Below Deck history.” • SciJinks (Science, May 16, Wednesdays at 10).

Johnny Galecki hosts the show that “[uses cutting-edge science as the foundation for outrageous stunts and practical jokes” • Citizen Rose (E!, May 17, Thursdays at 10). This three-episode series “picks up where the two-hour documentary left off, with [Rose] McGowan set to launch her now New York Times bestselling think piece BRAVE into a world in which she is at the center of a massive social and cultural change.” • The Carbonaro Effect (truTV, May 17, Thursdays at 10).

Michael Carbonaro “performs ingenious tricks on unsuspecting members of the public, all caught on hidden camera” • Carriers at War (Smithsonian, May 20, Sundays at 8). “journeys aboard today’s carriers” for “an intimate look at how the U.S. Navy maintains, operates and deploys to troubled spots around the globe” • Total Bellas (E!, May 20, Sundays at 9). “Season three will follow Nikki Bella and John Cena through their ups and downs as they plan their wedding” and “Brie Bella and Daniel Bryan [who] navigate balancing work obligations with being home for their daughter” • Iron Chef America (Food Network, May 20, Sundays at 10).

Alton Brown hosts the competition, which returns to its “classic fan-favorite format” • Lost in Transition (TLC, May 20, Sundays at 10). “will chronicle the lives of four couples,” in which women have “recently found out that her husband has grappled with his gender identity for years and has made the brave decision to become the woman he is inside” • Who Do You Think You Are? (TLC, May 21, Mondays at 9). The genealogy series that promises to “reveal surprising family histories” returns with episodes featuring Hilary Duff, Jean Smart, Jon Cryer, Laverne Cox, Megan Mullally, and Molly Shannon.

• Shaunie’s Home Court (VH1, May 21, Mondays at 10). Basketball Wives’ “Shaunie O’Neal gives us a personal, unexpected look at what it takes to get her team of five kids off the bench and into the game of life” • Our Wild Life (TLC, May 22, Tuesdays at 9). Follows a family that has five children and 81 animals. • 48 Hours: NCIS (CBS, May 22, Tuesdays at 10). “gives viewers unprecedented access to the dramatic and shocking cases handled by the real-life U.S.

Naval Criminal Investigative Service” • Explained (Netflix, May 23, Wednesdays). “digs into a wide range of topics such as the rise of cryptocurrency, why diets fail, and the wild world of K-pop” • Growing Up Hip Hop (WE tv, May 24, Thursdays at 9). “the next generation of hip hop royalty sets out to do whatever it takes to rise above their legendary parents’ shadow” • The Fourth Estate (Showtime, May 27, Sundays at 8).

Goes behind the scenes of The New York Times with “unprecedented access to the inner workings of the Times, including filming inside closed-door meetings, rare interviews with the editors and reporters who cover the President and the tumult around him” • Street Outlaws (Discovery, May 28 at 8, then Mondays at 9). “the 405 bands together to update the rules guiding the most contentious street races in the nation” • Cults and Extreme Belief (A&E, May 28 at 10, then Tuesdays at 10). “will take an immersive look at one currently active group through the eyes of past devotees and get perspective from believers and leaders that are still inside” • (NBC, May 29, Tuesdays at 8).

Simon Cowell, Mel B, Heidi Klum, and Howie Mandel return to judge the summer talent competition, with host Tyra Banks. • Beat Shazam (Fox, May 29, Tuesdays at 8). Jamie Foxx hosts the game show that “pits teams of two against the clock and each other as they attempt to identify the biggest hit songs of all time” • Love Connection (Fox, May 29, Tuesdays at 9).

Andy Cohen hosts the show where couples meet and then go on a first date. • World of Dance (NBC, May 29, Tuesdays at 10). “gives dancers the platform to showcase their talents and compete for a life-altering grand prize of $1 million” • Expedition Unknown (Discovery, May 29, Tuesdays at 10). “Josh Gates sets out across the globe to investigate the greatest mysteries of all time” • Hunting ISIS (History, May 29, Tuesdays at 10; Viceland, June 3, Sundays at 10) Follows “western volunteers” who “join the fight against the terrorist group” ISIS.

• (NBC, May 30, Wednesdays at 8 until June 18, then Mondays at 8). “follows competitors as they tackle a series of challenging obstacle courses in both city qualifying and city finals rounds across the country” • (Fox, May 30, Wednesdays at 8). Gordon Ramsay, Aaron Sanchez, and Joe Bastianich judge the ninth season of the cooking competition.

• Black Ink Crew: Chicago (VH1, May 30, Wednesdays at 8). This season: “Can 9 Mag undergo a successful restructuring despite old betrayals, new rivalries and opposing views on the future?” • Man Fire Food (Cooking Channel, May 30, Wednesdays at 9). “celebrates the passion for building and cooking with fire” Three days after we rehearsed Schmergen Brawl, the reward challenge on last night’s episode, Luna, the proprietor of our hotel Le Manumea, looked at me and said, “You’re damaged.” Then she said, “You’re all damaged.” We were.

I got away pretty easily: torn-up and scraped-up knees and elbows, big bruises on my arms and legs,… Andy Dehnart’s writing and criticism about television, culture, and media has appeared on NPR and in Vulture, Pacific Standard, The Los Angeles Times, and other publications. He has covered reality television for more than 18 years, and created reality blurred in 2000. A member of the Television Critics Association, Andy, 41, also directs the journalism program at Stetson University in Florida, where he teaches creative nonfiction and journalism.

He has an M.F.A. in nonfiction writing and literature from Bennington College. is your guide to the world of reality TV and unscripted entertainment, with reality show reviews, news, and analysis. It was created in 2000 by . He's still writing and publishing it today. reality blurred is regularly updated with highlights from the world of reality TV: news and analysis; behind-the-scenes reports; interviews with reality TV show cast members and producers; and recaps and reviews of , including Survivor, Big Brother, The Great British Baking Show, Shark Tank, The Amazing Race, The Bachelor, Project Runway, Dancing with the Stars, Top Chef, and many more.


best new reality tv shows of all time list 2018

best new reality tv shows of all time list 2018 -


best new reality tv shows of all time list 2018

Image The best series of the year included, from left, “The Americans,” with Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell; “Killing Eve,” with Sandra Oh; “Atlanta,” with Lakeith Stanfield and Donald Glover; and “Lodge 49,” with Wyatt Russell.

Credit Credit From left, FX; BBC America; Guy D'Alema/FX; Jackson Lee Davis/AMC TV gets better and better, but it does not necessarily do so in a straight line. [] The first several months of 2018, I worried I might have a hard time filling this list. The last half of the year, though, came on with a burst of creativity that kept me adding and subtracting to the last minute.

[ ] This is one reason I don’t rank it in order. I’d be lying if I told you I liked my No. 7 show measurably better than No. 8, and you could make a solid Top 10 out of my near-misses (“Babylon Berlin,” “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” and “Better Call Saul” among them). ‘The Americans’ (FX) You had to know was going to hurt. The final season of this family spy drama with a melancholy heart as big as Mother Russia brought the long con of Elizabeth and Philip Jennings (Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys) to an end.

The devastating, though largely bloodless, finale stayed true to the series’s theme that often the greatest sacrifices you make for a doomed cause are emotional. (Streaming on and .) ‘America to Me’ (Starz) I cringe when critics say, “You have to watch this” — there’s no better way to make TV sound like a chore. But , set at a racially integrated school in Oak Park, Ill., was not homework.

The sprawling, nuance-minded story explored the difficulties of racial inequity, even in a socially conscious school. But more than that, it was an involving, big-hearted story of , their dreams, their challenges, their triumphs and their everyday drama. You don’t have to watch “America to Me.” But you’ll be glad if you do. (Streaming on .) ‘Atlanta Robbin’ Season’ (FX) The of “Atlanta” had a theme: money, scams and the precarious struggle of its characters on the periphery of the hip-hop business to hang on to what they have.

But this creation by Donald Glover and company also retained its ability to become anything from episode to episode: gothic horror in the episode picaresque comedy in and poignant coming-of-age in At a peak moment for pop-culture Afro-surrealism ( on TV, in the theaters), “Atlanta” remained the kingpin. (Streaming on .) ‘Barry’ (HBO) and ‘Killing Eve’ (BBC America) I pair these shows together not to cheat an extra show into my list — well, maybe a little bit — but because they’re two sides of a bloody coin.

Both are mordant stories about assassins: , a burned out ex-soldier who longs to become an actor, and , a gleeful huntress playing cat-and-mouse with an intelligence-agency bureaucrat (Sandra Oh). But beyond the obvious, these two stories show how some of today’s best TV exists in a gray area between genres. “Barry,” a half-hour “comedy” from Hader and Alec Berg, developed into something closer to a melancholy short drama; the creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge infused “Eve” with the brio of a dark comedy, though its hour length marked it as “crime drama.” Label them what you like; each hit its target.

(“Barry” is streaming on ; “Killing Eve” is streaming on .) ‘BoJack Horseman’ (Netflix) All things being equal, I prefer not to list the same show two years in a row. (This was the tiebreaker that barely eliminated “The Good Place.”) “BoJack” is a pristine example; after five seasons, it is so perceptive, moving and hilarious that it is easy to imagine it cemented on this list permanently.

Threading a nuanced arc about the #MeToo movement with a running joke about a robot built out of household appliances and sex toys, the season solidified this cartoon’s case as the best series ever made for streaming. (Streaming on .) ‘The Good Fight’ (CBS All Access) The second season of “The Good Fight” was the first great TV response to the election of Donald Trump, which has been marked mostly by a glut of and .

As the firm of Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) dove into the politics and conflicts of the Trump era — immigration, judicial appointments, #MeToo and a certain rumored Russian-hotel tape — what had been a perfectly decent sequel to “The Good Wife” returned invigorated, absurdist and energized for battle.

(Streaming on .) This defense-industry moved with military efficiency and artistic stealth. Julia Roberts’s first starring role for TV was her best in years, and she turned in an astonishing, finely calibrated performance. Adapting the series from a podcast drama, the director Sam Esmail applied the cinephilic wizardry he honed on “Mr. Robot” to a take on the paranoid thrillers of the ’70s.

Best of all, the whole season took a mere , which flew by but possessed the screen as if they had all the time in the world. (Streaming on .) ‘Lodge 49’ (AMC) Every year there’s a show or two for which my honest review is: “I can’t describe this. Just watch it.” gets to its story eventually, enfolding real estate, surfing and the arcane secrets of alchemy. But this comic-melancholy hangout is most worth watching for its generous portraits of the strivers and losers at and around a fraternal lodge in down-and-out Southern California.

Oddball and amiable, “Lodge 49” looked for meaning in sports-bar restaurants and closing aerospace factories, and it found a peculiar magic. (Streaming on .) ‘Pose’ (FX) On the demanding floor of New York’s 1980s ballroom competitions, the judging standard was flawlessness. But to me, moments of transcendence matter more than lack of faults. And in those moments, Ryan Murphy’s resplendent series soared like a plumed miracle.

“Pose” had clumsy and oversentimental aspects. But it also had an immediate verve, cut-to-the-bone performances and heart to spare. I’ll probably think of more than anything else when I think of 2018 TV, and if that’s not the definition of “best,” then it’s something better. (Streaming on .) ‘Sharp Objects’ (HBO) I teetered between and the excellent for what you might call the HBO literary-adaptation slot.

“Sharp Objects,” adapted by Marti Noxon from the novel by Gillian Flynn, was the more inventive reimagining for the screen, and thus better TV as TV.

Noxon captured the open-wound psyche of Camille Preaker (a wholly committed ). The director, , created a soundscape and aesthetic that was almost tactile: You could feel the humidity, hear the lazy insects. Few series have done so well at putting you in a protagonist’s mind and in her world. (Streaming on .) Mike Hale The Best International Shows Weimar decadence, Scandi-noir and gentle British comedy. The magic number that’s used to scare us these days with regard to the excessive population of scripted television shows is 500.

But my research — consisting of poring over my own obsessively maintained lists — indicates that in 2018, the number of new seasons of international shows alone was more than 600. Chinese soap operas and Korean romantic comedies, British conspiracy thrillers, Indian gangster sagas, moody Scandinavian ghost stories, Mexican melodramas, Spanish crime capers, French children’s shows and Japanese anime — the only bar to entry is how many TV and streaming subscriptions you’re willing to spring for.

The other issue is time, of course. The shows on the following list are my 10 favorites among the relatively small share of international series I was able to sample. Please use the comments to fill in the gaps with your own picks. (Before you ask, “The Crown” didn’t have a new season in 2018.) 1. ‘A Very English Scandal’ (Amazon) takes the self-effacing charm that’s served him so well in romantic comedy and turns it inside out in this insouciant, scathing written by Russell T.

Davies and directed by Stephen Frears. Grant is both magnificently creepy and oddly poignant as the British politician Jeremy Thorpe, brought down by scandal in the late 1970s, and Ben Whishaw is also outstanding as Norman Josiffe, Thorpe’s ex-lover, who refused to go away quietly. (Streaming on .) 2. ‘The Bridge’ (Hulu) The fourth and final season of this Scandi-noir bellwether was, like the first three, complicated, spine-tingling, a little over the top and occasionally quite funny (in the studiously deadpan Nordic manner).

It went beyond them in finally unraveling the tormented history of the Swedish super-cop Saga Noren (Sofia Helin), and it provided her with a valedictory moment that was inevitable (if you had watched the whole series) but still devastating.

(Streaming on .) 3. ‘The End of the ____ing World’ (Netflix) Adapting a graphic novel by Charles S. Forsman, the British actress and writer Charlie Covell takes the delinquent-teenagers-on-the-run story and and more delicate than we’re accustomed to. Jessica Barden and Alex Lawther play a budding nihilist and an aspiring psychopath who meet dark (he’s looking for a first victim and she’ll do) and hit the roads of northern England in a stolen car, discovering that the adult world can be a colder place than even they could imagine.

(Streaming on .) 4. ‘Babylon Berlin’ (Netflix) It’s “Law & Order: Weimar Republic,” in (one of its writer-directors is Tom Tykwer of “Run Lola Run”) that combines the nitty-gritty satisfactions of the crime drama with the more voluptuous pleasures of “Cabaret”-style decadence and foreboding. Volker Bruch and Liv Lisa Fries are both excellent, he as a vice cop trying to hide the symptoms of shell shock and she as a sometime clerk for the homicide department who wants to be a detective, but in the meantime has to work as a prostitute to cover the rent.

(Streaming on .) 5. ‘Detectorists’ (AcornTV) The last season of Mackenzie Crook’s — hushed but never too gentle — found the metal detectorists Andy and Lance (Crook and the peerless Toby Jones) racing the clock.

Their access to a promising empty field was threatened by a solar-energy company’s plans, and magpies kept carrying away the Roman coins they found there. Less time was spent with the quirky members of the Danebury Metal Detecting Club, but the trade-off was more time with loved ones and family members crisply played by Rebecca Callard, Rachael Stirling and Diana Rigg.

(Streaming on .) 6. ‘Money Heist’ (Netflix) Properly titled “La Casa de Papel,” or House of Paper, Alex Pina’s caper story (two seasons totaling 22 episodes were released on Netflix) is a joy ride in every sense. A mastermind recruits and trains eight accomplices to hit the Spanish mint, and the protracted but breathless narrative generously accommodates a sharply drawn cast of thieves, cops, relatives and eventually hostages.

(Streaming on .) 7. ‘Unforgotten’ (PBS) and ‘The Split’ (Sundance TV) Nicola Walker is everywhere in British TV (six-episode seasons help), and she’s always good. She was at the center of each of these series, as a quietly compassionate cold-case cop in the first and as a quietly angry divorce lawyer with her own marital and family issues in the second. “Unforgotten,” created by Chris Lang for ITV, is melancholic and deliberate while “The Split,” created by Abi Morgan for BBC, is biting and fast-paced.

Both are intelligent and thoroughly imagined — they’re melodramas with no artificial aftertaste. (“Unforgotten” is streaming on and ; “The Split” is streaming on .) 8. ‘A Place Further Than the Universe’ (Crunchyroll) A high-spirited, jokey anime series about four teenage girls who join a scientific expedition to Japan’s Antarctic research station might sound like a show with a pretty specific audience.

But “A Place,” written by Jukki Hanada and directed by Atsuko Ishizuka, is a funny and moving coming-of-age story that should translate across all boundaries of age or culture. Never mawkish or contrived, it’s an absolutely authentic depiction of how friendship can overcome adolescent anxiety and grief. (Streaming on .) 9.

‘Manon 5 Years On’ (Walter Presents) Jean-Xavier de Lestrade, known for the true-crime documentary series directed this proletarian slice-of-life mini-series for the French network Arte. “Three Times Manon,” are both . Across the two series’s six hours, Alba Gaïa Bellugi draws you in and pulls you along as the raging, suspicious and at first barely articulate Manon. In “5 Years On” she’s 20 and recently released from reform school, holding down a job at an auto shop and discovering a hunger for, and terror of, romance.

(Streaming on .) 10. ‘Howards End’ (Starz) Among the year’s British literary adaptations, based on the E.M. Forster novel edges out “The Woman in White” and “A Child in Time” on PBS. Matthew Macfadyen captured the dignity, kindness and obstinacy of the businessman Henry Wilcox; Hayley Atwell and Philippa Coulthard gave engaging, intelligent readings of the highly principled Schlegel sisters (though it was hard not to judge them against the memorable performances of Emma Thompson and Helena Bonham Carter in the 1992 film).

But the real star of the four-part series was Kenneth Lonergan’s brisk and lucid screenplay. (Streaming on .) Margaret Lyons The Best New Shows Top debuts included addictive thrillers and nihilistic satires.

Even though Peak TV shows no real signs of actually peaking, this wasn’t a banner year for new shows — most of the year’s standouts were veteran series. There were hundreds of premieres, which often felt like thousands of premieres, which is why no one person can possibly watch it all.

I know I’ve missed some great shows in the last 12 months. All I can say is I’ve caught some great ones, too, and these were the freshmen that stood out. 1. ‘Barry’ (HBO) and ‘Killing Eve’ (BBC America) I’m cheating a little, but these shows debuted within weeks of each other and created an unintentional but wonderful assassin double feature. Each successfully tweaked its ostensible genre’s tone — “Killing Eve” bringing glam, humor and humanity to the often grim espionage thriller, and “Barry” adding icy violence and a sense of true danger and surprise to the showbiz black-comedy genre.

And both shows included career-defining performances from actors whose careers were already pretty well defined: Sandra Oh earned her for “Eve,” and Bill Hader and Henry Winkler each won their first acting Emmys for their work on “Barry.” 3.

‘Lodge 49’ (AMC) The dreamy-surfy “Lodge 49” has arguably the best casting of any series on this list. A show this gentle and diffuse only works if all the performances have a strong gravitational pull, and the show lives and dies on Wyatt Russell’s ability to give the dopey but loyal Dud enough grounding.

Luckily Russell’s terrific, as is the rest of the cast — especially Brent Jennings as Ernie, Dud’s mentor in the show’s fictional fraternal order, and Sonya Cassidy as Liz, Dud’s twin sister who’s been handling the family’s affairs since their dad died. “Lodge 49” has a radiant internal decency, one that respects its characters’ sometimes silly quests because it’s a series that knows trying new things is hard but worth it.

4. ‘America to Me’ (Starz) I’m counting this as a full-on show and not a mini-series because at 10 episodes it feels and moves like a regular series, and also because I hope there’s another season someday.

The show comes from the director (“Hoop Dreams”) and follows a handful of students through a school year at Oak Park and River Forest High School, which prides itself on its diversity.

But racism pulses through the school’s veins in overt and covert ways, as acutely observed in this intimate and memorable documentary. 5. ‘Queer Eye’ (Netflix) Because this is a reboot — new cast, new setting — and not a revival, it qualifies as a new show. And because it’s loving, interesting and jubilant, it qualifies as one of the best new shows.

The , based out of Atlanta, give makeovers to deserving individuals and emotional sustenance to viewers. There were two seasons of the show in 2018, and the second is superior, but both have an earnestness and positivity that are a welcome respite from the grinding misery of life. (Streaming on .) 6. ‘You’ (Lifetime) I ripped through the 10 episodes of like a fiend, like it was salt and vinegar chips, like it was Christmas morning, like I had rabies.

It’s that fun and that addictive — and that close to the edge of being straight-up trashy. Instead, the drama about a bookstore manager stalking an MFA student is a savvy sendup of social media culture (well, “culture”) and New York nonsense, packaged in a tight thriller with a gloriously nasty sense of humor. (Streaming on .) 7. ‘Sorry for Your Loss’ (Facebook Watch) TV is not great at depicting grief. Usually shows race through the mourning period, never mention dead characters again and don’t acknowledge the looping nature of despair and the permanence of profound loss.

Then there’s this show, which … does. Elizabeth Olsen’s portrayal of a young widow is prickly and real, and the characters around her are all dealing with their own lives in addition to supporting her through her trauma.

There’s only so much support anyone can give, and that anyone can accept. (Streaming on .) 8. ‘Corporate’ (Comedy Central) The latest entry in the terrible workplace genre, is as nihilistic as they come, so bleak it often becomes absurd and even supernatural. Because the corporation at the heart of “Corporate” is so large — their slogan is “We don’t make anything, we make everything” — the characters have no respite from their overlords, and even weekends, parties and restaurants are tinged with office-adjacent misery.

Because many people will experience work drudgery in their lives, shows or movies about it are better when they’re surgically specific in their critiques — and “Corporate” is. (Streaming on .) 9. ‘Cupcake and Dino: General Services’ (Netflix) Warning: This show has the catchiest theme song maybe ever, all the more dangerous because its lyrics are just the name of the show, so every time you mention “Cupcake and Dino,” it’s an invitation to just sing the song.

This gleeful cartoon about two brothers who take on odd jobs all over their town of Big City is reminiscent of but a little more wild and silly.

(Streaming on .) 10. ‘Pose’ (FX) Ryan Murphy’s ensemble drama set within the drag world of 1980s New York knows how to balance its sad side with its soapy side with its fun side with its human side. It’s a show about allegiance and community, about characters who have found one another on the fringes and made a life and a world for themselves.


best new reality tv shows of all time list 2018

Image The best series of the year included, from left, “The Americans,” with Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell; “Killing Eve,” with Sandra Oh; “Atlanta,” with Lakeith Stanfield and Donald Glover; and “Lodge 49,” with Wyatt Russell.

Credit Credit From left, FX; BBC America; Guy D'Alema/FX; Jackson Lee Davis/AMC TV gets better and better, but it does not necessarily do so in a straight line.

[] The first several months of 2018, I worried I might have a hard time filling this list. The last half of the year, though, came on with a burst of creativity that kept me adding and subtracting to the last minute. [ ] This is one reason I don’t rank it in order. I’d be lying if I told you I liked my No. 7 show measurably better than No. 8, and you could make a solid Top 10 out of my near-misses (“Babylon Berlin,” “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” and “Better Call Saul” among them).

‘The Americans’ (FX) You had to know was going to hurt. The final season of this family spy drama with a melancholy heart as big as Mother Russia brought the long con of Elizabeth and Philip Jennings (Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys) to an end. The devastating, though largely bloodless, finale stayed true to the series’s theme that often the greatest sacrifices you make for a doomed cause are emotional.

(Streaming on and .) ‘America to Me’ (Starz) I cringe when critics say, “You have to watch this” — there’s no better way to make TV sound like a chore. But , set at a racially integrated school in Oak Park, Ill., was not homework. The sprawling, nuance-minded story explored the difficulties of racial inequity, even in a socially conscious school. But more than that, it was an involving, big-hearted story of , their dreams, their challenges, their triumphs and their everyday drama.

You don’t have to watch “America to Me.” But you’ll be glad if you do. (Streaming on .) ‘Atlanta Robbin’ Season’ (FX) The of “Atlanta” had a theme: money, scams and the precarious struggle of its characters on the periphery of the hip-hop business to hang on to what they have. But this creation by Donald Glover and company also retained its ability to become anything from episode to episode: gothic horror in the episode picaresque comedy in and poignant coming-of-age in At a peak moment for pop-culture Afro-surrealism ( on TV, in the theaters), “Atlanta” remained the kingpin.

(Streaming on .) ‘Barry’ (HBO) and ‘Killing Eve’ (BBC America) I pair these shows together not to cheat an extra show into my list — well, maybe a little bit — but because they’re two sides of a bloody coin.

Both are mordant stories about assassins: , a burned out ex-soldier who longs to become an actor, and , a gleeful huntress playing cat-and-mouse with an intelligence-agency bureaucrat (Sandra Oh). But beyond the obvious, these two stories show how some of today’s best TV exists in a gray area between genres. “Barry,” a half-hour “comedy” from Hader and Alec Berg, developed into something closer to a melancholy short drama; the creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge infused “Eve” with the brio of a dark comedy, though its hour length marked it as “crime drama.” Label them what you like; each hit its target.

(“Barry” is streaming on ; “Killing Eve” is streaming on .) ‘BoJack Horseman’ (Netflix) All things being equal, I prefer not to list the same show two years in a row.

(This was the tiebreaker that barely eliminated “The Good Place.”) “BoJack” is a pristine example; after five seasons, it is so perceptive, moving and hilarious that it is easy to imagine it cemented on this list permanently.

Threading a nuanced arc about the #MeToo movement with a running joke about a robot built out of household appliances and sex toys, the season solidified this cartoon’s case as the best series ever made for streaming.

(Streaming on .) ‘The Good Fight’ (CBS All Access) The second season of “The Good Fight” was the first great TV response to the election of Donald Trump, which has been marked mostly by a glut of and .

As the firm of Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) dove into the politics and conflicts of the Trump era — immigration, judicial appointments, #MeToo and a certain rumored Russian-hotel tape — what had been a perfectly decent sequel to “The Good Wife” returned invigorated, absurdist and energized for battle.

(Streaming on .) This defense-industry moved with military efficiency and artistic stealth. Julia Roberts’s first starring role for TV was her best in years, and she turned in an astonishing, finely calibrated performance. Adapting the series from a podcast drama, the director Sam Esmail applied the cinephilic wizardry he honed on “Mr. Robot” to a take on the paranoid thrillers of the ’70s. Best of all, the whole season took a mere , which flew by but possessed the screen as if they had all the time in the world.

(Streaming on .) ‘Lodge 49’ (AMC) Every year there’s a show or two for which my honest review is: “I can’t describe this. Just watch it.” gets to its story eventually, enfolding real estate, surfing and the arcane secrets of alchemy.

But this comic-melancholy hangout is most worth watching for its generous portraits of the strivers and losers at and around a fraternal lodge in down-and-out Southern California.

Oddball and amiable, “Lodge 49” looked for meaning in sports-bar restaurants and closing aerospace factories, and it found a peculiar magic. (Streaming on .) ‘Pose’ (FX) On the demanding floor of New York’s 1980s ballroom competitions, the judging standard was flawlessness. But to me, moments of transcendence matter more than lack of faults. And in those moments, Ryan Murphy’s resplendent series soared like a plumed miracle. “Pose” had clumsy and oversentimental aspects. But it also had an immediate verve, cut-to-the-bone performances and heart to spare.

I’ll probably think of more than anything else when I think of 2018 TV, and if that’s not the definition of “best,” then it’s something better. (Streaming on .) ‘Sharp Objects’ (HBO) I teetered between and the excellent for what you might call the HBO literary-adaptation slot. “Sharp Objects,” adapted by Marti Noxon from the novel by Gillian Flynn, was the more inventive reimagining for the screen, and thus better TV as TV.

Noxon captured the open-wound psyche of Camille Preaker (a wholly committed ). The director, , created a soundscape and aesthetic that was almost tactile: You could feel the humidity, hear the lazy insects. Few series have done so well at putting you in a protagonist’s mind and in her world. (Streaming on .) Mike Hale The Best International Shows Weimar decadence, Scandi-noir and gentle British comedy. The magic number that’s used to scare us these days with regard to the excessive population of scripted television shows is 500.

But my research — consisting of poring over my own obsessively maintained lists — indicates that in 2018, the number of new seasons of international shows alone was more than 600. Chinese soap operas and Korean romantic comedies, British conspiracy thrillers, Indian gangster sagas, moody Scandinavian ghost stories, Mexican melodramas, Spanish crime capers, French children’s shows and Japanese anime — the only bar to entry is how many TV and streaming subscriptions you’re willing to spring for.

The other issue is time, of course. The shows on the following list are my 10 favorites among the relatively small share of international series I was able to sample.

Please use the comments to fill in the gaps with your own picks. (Before you ask, “The Crown” didn’t have a new season in 2018.) 1. ‘A Very English Scandal’ (Amazon) takes the self-effacing charm that’s served him so well in romantic comedy and turns it inside out in this insouciant, scathing written by Russell T.

Davies and directed by Stephen Frears. Grant is both magnificently creepy and oddly poignant as the British politician Jeremy Thorpe, brought down by scandal in the late 1970s, and Ben Whishaw is also outstanding as Norman Josiffe, Thorpe’s ex-lover, who refused to go away quietly.

(Streaming on .) 2. ‘The Bridge’ (Hulu) The fourth and final season of this Scandi-noir bellwether was, like the first three, complicated, spine-tingling, a little over the top and occasionally quite funny (in the studiously deadpan Nordic manner). It went beyond them in finally unraveling the tormented history of the Swedish super-cop Saga Noren (Sofia Helin), and it provided her with a valedictory moment that was inevitable (if you had watched the whole series) but still devastating.

(Streaming on .) 3. ‘The End of the ____ing World’ (Netflix) Adapting a graphic novel by Charles S. Forsman, the British actress and writer Charlie Covell takes the delinquent-teenagers-on-the-run story and and more delicate than we’re accustomed to. Jessica Barden and Alex Lawther play a budding nihilist and an aspiring psychopath who meet dark (he’s looking for a first victim and she’ll do) and hit the roads of northern England in a stolen car, discovering that the adult world can be a colder place than even they could imagine.

(Streaming on .) 4. ‘Babylon Berlin’ (Netflix) It’s “Law & Order: Weimar Republic,” in (one of its writer-directors is Tom Tykwer of “Run Lola Run”) that combines the nitty-gritty satisfactions of the crime drama with the more voluptuous pleasures of “Cabaret”-style decadence and foreboding. Volker Bruch and Liv Lisa Fries are both excellent, he as a vice cop trying to hide the symptoms of shell shock and she as a sometime clerk for the homicide department who wants to be a detective, but in the meantime has to work as a prostitute to cover the rent.

(Streaming on .) 5. ‘Detectorists’ (AcornTV) The last season of Mackenzie Crook’s — hushed but never too gentle — found the metal detectorists Andy and Lance (Crook and the peerless Toby Jones) racing the clock.

Their access to a promising empty field was threatened by a solar-energy company’s plans, and magpies kept carrying away the Roman coins they found there. Less time was spent with the quirky members of the Danebury Metal Detecting Club, but the trade-off was more time with loved ones and family members crisply played by Rebecca Callard, Rachael Stirling and Diana Rigg. (Streaming on .) 6. ‘Money Heist’ (Netflix) Properly titled “La Casa de Papel,” or House of Paper, Alex Pina’s caper story (two seasons totaling 22 episodes were released on Netflix) is a joy ride in every sense.

A mastermind recruits and trains eight accomplices to hit the Spanish mint, and the protracted but breathless narrative generously accommodates a sharply drawn cast of thieves, cops, relatives and eventually hostages.

(Streaming on .) 7. ‘Unforgotten’ (PBS) and ‘The Split’ (Sundance TV) Nicola Walker is everywhere in British TV (six-episode seasons help), and she’s always good. She was at the center of each of these series, as a quietly compassionate cold-case cop in the first and as a quietly angry divorce lawyer with her own marital and family issues in the second.

“Unforgotten,” created by Chris Lang for ITV, is melancholic and deliberate while “The Split,” created by Abi Morgan for BBC, is biting and fast-paced. Both are intelligent and thoroughly imagined — they’re melodramas with no artificial aftertaste.

(“Unforgotten” is streaming on and ; “The Split” is streaming on .) 8. ‘A Place Further Than the Universe’ (Crunchyroll) A high-spirited, jokey anime series about four teenage girls who join a scientific expedition to Japan’s Antarctic research station might sound like a show with a pretty specific audience. But “A Place,” written by Jukki Hanada and directed by Atsuko Ishizuka, is a funny and moving coming-of-age story that should translate across all boundaries of age or culture.

Never mawkish or contrived, it’s an absolutely authentic depiction of how friendship can overcome adolescent anxiety and grief. (Streaming on .) 9. ‘Manon 5 Years On’ (Walter Presents) Jean-Xavier de Lestrade, known for the true-crime documentary series directed this proletarian slice-of-life mini-series for the French network Arte. “Three Times Manon,” are both .

Across the two series’s six hours, Alba Gaïa Bellugi draws you in and pulls you along as the raging, suspicious and at first barely articulate Manon. In “5 Years On” she’s 20 and recently released from reform school, holding down a job at an auto shop and discovering a hunger for, and terror of, romance. (Streaming on .) 10.

‘Howards End’ (Starz) Among the year’s British literary adaptations, based on the E.M. Forster novel edges out “The Woman in White” and “A Child in Time” on PBS. Matthew Macfadyen captured the dignity, kindness and obstinacy of the businessman Henry Wilcox; Hayley Atwell and Philippa Coulthard gave engaging, intelligent readings of the highly principled Schlegel sisters (though it was hard not to judge them against the memorable performances of Emma Thompson and Helena Bonham Carter in the 1992 film).

But the real star of the four-part series was Kenneth Lonergan’s brisk and lucid screenplay. (Streaming on .) Margaret Lyons The Best New Shows Top debuts included addictive thrillers and nihilistic satires. Even though Peak TV shows no real signs of actually peaking, this wasn’t a banner year for new shows — most of the year’s standouts were veteran series.

There were hundreds of premieres, which often felt like thousands of premieres, which is why no one person can possibly watch it all. I know I’ve missed some great shows in the last 12 months. All I can say is I’ve caught some great ones, too, and these were the freshmen that stood out. 1. ‘Barry’ (HBO) and ‘Killing Eve’ (BBC America) I’m cheating a little, but these shows debuted within weeks of each other and created an unintentional but wonderful assassin double feature.

Each successfully tweaked its ostensible genre’s tone — “Killing Eve” bringing glam, humor and humanity to the often grim espionage thriller, and “Barry” adding icy violence and a sense of true danger and surprise to the showbiz black-comedy genre.

And both shows included career-defining performances from actors whose careers were already pretty well defined: Sandra Oh earned her for “Eve,” and Bill Hader and Henry Winkler each won their first acting Emmys for their work on “Barry.” 3.

‘Lodge 49’ (AMC) The dreamy-surfy “Lodge 49” has arguably the best casting of any series on this list. A show this gentle and diffuse only works if all the performances have a strong gravitational pull, and the show lives and dies on Wyatt Russell’s ability to give the dopey but loyal Dud enough grounding.

Luckily Russell’s terrific, as is the rest of the cast — especially Brent Jennings as Ernie, Dud’s mentor in the show’s fictional fraternal order, and Sonya Cassidy as Liz, Dud’s twin sister who’s been handling the family’s affairs since their dad died.

“Lodge 49” has a radiant internal decency, one that respects its characters’ sometimes silly quests because it’s a series that knows trying new things is hard but worth it.

4. ‘America to Me’ (Starz) I’m counting this as a full-on show and not a mini-series because at 10 episodes it feels and moves like a regular series, and also because I hope there’s another season someday. The show comes from the director (“Hoop Dreams”) and follows a handful of students through a school year at Oak Park and River Forest High School, which prides itself on its diversity.

But racism pulses through the school’s veins in overt and covert ways, as acutely observed in this intimate and memorable documentary. 5. ‘Queer Eye’ (Netflix) Because this is a reboot — new cast, new setting — and not a revival, it qualifies as a new show.

And because it’s loving, interesting and jubilant, it qualifies as one of the best new shows. The , based out of Atlanta, give makeovers to deserving individuals and emotional sustenance to viewers. There were two seasons of the show in 2018, and the second is superior, but both have an earnestness and positivity that are a welcome respite from the grinding misery of life.

(Streaming on .) 6. ‘You’ (Lifetime) I ripped through the 10 episodes of like a fiend, like it was salt and vinegar chips, like it was Christmas morning, like I had rabies.

It’s that fun and that addictive — and that close to the edge of being straight-up trashy. Instead, the drama about a bookstore manager stalking an MFA student is a savvy sendup of social media culture (well, “culture”) and New York nonsense, packaged in a tight thriller with a gloriously nasty sense of humor.

(Streaming on .) 7. ‘Sorry for Your Loss’ (Facebook Watch) TV is not great at depicting grief. Usually shows race through the mourning period, never mention dead characters again and don’t acknowledge the looping nature of despair and the permanence of profound loss. Then there’s this show, which … does. Elizabeth Olsen’s portrayal of a young widow is prickly and real, and the characters around her are all dealing with their own lives in addition to supporting her through her trauma.

There’s only so much support anyone can give, and that anyone can accept. (Streaming on .) 8. ‘Corporate’ (Comedy Central) The latest entry in the terrible workplace genre, is as nihilistic as they come, so bleak it often becomes absurd and even supernatural. Because the corporation at the heart of “Corporate” is so large — their slogan is “We don’t make anything, we make everything” — the characters have no respite from their overlords, and even weekends, parties and restaurants are tinged with office-adjacent misery.

Because many people will experience work drudgery in their lives, shows or movies about it are better when they’re surgically specific in their critiques — and “Corporate” is. (Streaming on .) 9. ‘Cupcake and Dino: General Services’ (Netflix) Warning: This show has the catchiest theme song maybe ever, all the more dangerous because its lyrics are just the name of the show, so every time you mention “Cupcake and Dino,” it’s an invitation to just sing the song.

This gleeful cartoon about two brothers who take on odd jobs all over their town of Big City is reminiscent of but a little more wild and silly. (Streaming on .) 10. ‘Pose’ (FX) Ryan Murphy’s ensemble drama set within the drag world of 1980s New York knows how to balance its sad side with its soapy side with its fun side with its human side.

It’s a show about allegiance and community, about characters who have found one another on the fringes and made a life and a world for themselves.


Top 10 Best New TV Shows of 2018 to Watch Now!
Best new reality tv shows of all time list 2018 Rating: 6,2/10 1542 reviews
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