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This article is about current LGBT rights around the world. For historical and current movements to further LGBT rights, see .

For intersex rights, see and . Laws affecting , , , and () people vary greatly by country or territory — encompassing everything from the legal recognition of to the . LGBT rights worldwide Rings indicate areas where local judges have granted or denied marriages or imposed the death penalty in a jurisdiction where that is not otherwise the law or areas with a case-by-case application.

1 Some jurisdictions in this category may currently have other types of partnerships. 2 No arrests in the past three years or on law. Non-member states States that are not voting members of the United Nations Laws that affect LGBT people include, but are not limited to, the following: • laws concerning the recognition of , including , , and • laws concerning , including • in employment, housing, education, public accommodations • to protect LGBT children at school • imposing enhanced criminal penalties for prejudice-motivated • affecting access to sex-segregated facilities by transgender people • laws related to • laws concerning access to • that penalize consensual same-sex sexual activity • laws that may impose higher ages for same-sex sexual activity • laws regarding • laws concerning access to and • Notably, 25 countries, all of which being developed democracies or developing democracies, recognized as of 2018.

By contrast, 10 countries or jurisdictions, all of which are Islamic and ruled by , were imposing the . In 2011, the passed its first resolution recognizing LGBT rights, following which the issued a report documenting violations of the rights of LGBT people, including , criminalization of , and .

Following the issuance of the report, the urged all countries which had not yet done so to enact laws protecting basic LGBT rights. See also: , , , , and Ancient Celts According to , although most "belligerent nations" were strongly influenced by their women, the Celts were unusual because their men openly preferred male lovers ( II 1269b). H. D. Rankin in Celts and the Classical World notes that "Athenaeus echoes this comment (603a) and so does (30.9).

It seems to be the general opinion of antiquity." In book XIII of his , the Roman Greek rhetorician and grammarian , repeating assertions made by in the 1st century BC ( 5:32), wrote that Celtic women were beautiful but that the men preferred to sleep together. Diodorus went further, stating that "the young men will offer themselves to strangers and are insulted if the offer is refused".

Rankin argues that the ultimate source of these assertions is likely to be and speculates that these authors may be recording "some kind of bonding ritual ... which requires abstinence from women at certain times". Ancient India Throughout and texts there are many descriptions of saints, demigods, and even the Supreme Lord transcending gender norms and manifesting multiple combinations of sex and gender.

There are several instances in ancient of same sex depictions and unions by gods and goddesses. There are several stories depicting love between those of the same sex, especially among kings and queens. , the ancient treatise on love talks about feelings for same sexes. are also venerated e.g.

as and as (which means half woman). Ancient West Asia Ancient Israel The ancient (the ) forbids men lying with men (intercourse) in Leviticus 18 and gives a story of attempted homosexual rape in in the story of , the cities being soon destroyed after that.

The death penalty was prescribed. In Deuteronomy 22:5, cross-dressing is condemned as being "abominable". Ancient Persia In Persia homosexuality and homoerotic expressions were tolerated in numerous public places, from monasteries and seminaries to taverns, military camps, bathhouses, and coffee houses.

In the early era (1501–1723), male houses of ( amrad khane) were legally recognized and paid taxes. Persian poets, such as (d.

1291), (d. 1389), and (d. 1492), wrote poems replete with homoerotic allusions. The two most commonly documented forms were commercial sex with transgender young males or males enacting transgender roles exemplified by the and spiritual practices in which the practitioner admired the form of a beautiful boy in order to enter ecstatic states and glimpse the beauty of God. Assyria In society, were punished identically whether they were homosexual or heterosexual.

An individual faced no punishment for penetrating someone of equal , a cult prostitute, or with someone whose were not considered solidly masculine. Such sexual relations were even seen as good , with an , the , reading, "If a man copulates with his equal from the rear, he becomes the leader among his peers and brothers". However, homosexual relationships with fellow soldiers, slaves, royal attendants, or those where a social better was , were treated as bad .

Middle Assyrian dating 1075 BC has a particularly harsh law for , which reads: "If a man have intercourse with his brother-in-arms, they shall turn him into a eunuch." A similar law code reads, "If a seignior lay with his neighbor, when they have prosecuted him (and) convicted him, they shall lie with him (and) turn him into a ".

This law code condemns a situation that involves homosexual . Any Assyrian male could visit a or lie with another male, just as long as false rumors or forced sex were not involved with another male. Ancient Rome The "conquest mentality" of the shaped .

In the , a 's political liberty was defined in part by the right to preserve his body from physical compulsion or use by others; for the male citizen to submit his body to the giving of pleasure was considered servile. As long as a man played the penetrative role, it was socially acceptable and considered natural for him to have , without a perceived loss of his . The bodies of citizen youths were strictly off-limits, and the imposed penalties on those who committed a sex crime () against a .

Acceptable same-sex partners were males excluded from legal protections as citizens: , male , and the , entertainers or others who might be technically free but whose lifestyles set them outside the law.

"Homosexual" and "heterosexual" were thus not categories of , and no words exist in that would precisely translate these concepts. A male citizen who willingly performed or received was disparaged, but there is only limited evidence of legal penalties against these men, who were presumably "homosexual" in the modern sense.

In courtroom and political rhetoric, charges of and passive sexual behaviors were directed particularly at "democratic" politicians () such as and . addressed the as early as the 2nd century BC, when a ruling was issued in a case that may have involved a man of same-sex orientation. It was ruled that even a man who was "disreputable and questionable" had the same right as other citizens not to have his body subjected to forced sex.

A law probably dating to the of Julius Caesar defined rape as forced sex against "boy, woman, or anyone"; the rapist was subject to execution, a rare penalty in Roman law. A male classified as infamis, such as a prostitute or actor, could not as a matter of law be raped, nor could a slave, who was legally classified as property; the slave's owner, however, could prosecute the rapist for property damage.

In the of the Republic, violated the decorum against intercourse with citizens and was subject to harsh penalties, including death, as a violation of . The Greek historian (2nd century BC) lists , thieves, , and "those who in youth have abused their persons" as subject to the , clubbing to death. Ancient sources are most concerned with the effects of by officers, but the young soldier who brought an accusation against his superior needed to show that he had not willingly taken the passive role or prostituted himself.

Soldiers were free to have ; the use of a fellow citizen-soldier's body was prohibited, not homosexual behaviors per se. By the late Republic and throughout the , there is increasing evidence that men whose lifestyle marked them as "homosexual" in the modern sense served openly.

Although Roman law did not recognize marriage between men, and in general Romans regarded marriage as a heterosexual union with the primary purpose of producing children, in the early Imperial period some male couples were celebrating .

remarks with disapproval that his friends often attended such ceremonies. The emperor had two marriages to men, once as the bride (with a ) and once as the groom. His consort appeared in public as Nero's wife wearing the regalia that was customary for the Roman empress.

Apart from measures to protect the prerogatives of citizens, the prosecution of homosexuality as a general crime began in the 3rd century of the Christian era when male prostitution was banned by . By the end of the 4th century, after the had come under , passive homosexuality was . "Death by sword" was the punishment for a "man coupling like a woman" under the .

Under , all same-sex acts, passive or active, no matter who the partners, were declared contrary to nature and punishable by death. Congo recorded that in the past male warriors in the northern routinely took on young male lovers between the ages of twelve and twenty, who helped with household tasks and participated in with their older husbands.

The practice had died out by the early 20th century, after Europeans had gained control of African countries, but was recounted to Evans-Pritchard by the elders to whom he spoke. Feudal Japan In feudal , homosexuality was recognized, between equals (bi-do), in terms of (wakashudo), and in terms of prostitution. The younger partner in a pederastic relationship often was expected to make the first move; the opposite was true in ancient Greece.

In religious circles, same-sex love spread to the warrior () class, where it was customary for a boy in the age category to undergo training in the martial arts by apprenticing to a more experienced adult man. The man was permitted, if the boy agreed, to take the boy as his lover until he came of age; this relationship, often formalized in a "brotherhood contract", was expected to be exclusive, with both partners swearing to take no other (male) lovers.

The period was one in which homosexuality was seen as particularly positive. Later when Japanese society became pacified, the middle classes adopted many of the practices of the warrior class. Lesotho Anthropologists and reported that women in engaged in socially sanctioned "long term, erotic relationships" called . Papua New Guinea In , same-sex relationships were an integral part of the culture of certain tribes until the middle of the last century.

The and for example, even viewed heterosexuality as wasteful and celebrated homosexuality instead. They believed that in sharing semen, they are sharing their life force, yet women simply wasted this force any time they didn't get pregnant after sex.

In many traditional Melanesian cultures a prepubertal boy would be paired with an older adolescent who would become his mentor and who would "inseminate" him (orally, anally, or topically, depending on the tribe) over a number of years in order for the younger to also reach puberty.

Same-sex sexual intercourse illegal 1During , annexed territory or established which extended to those territories and reichskommissariats. Age of consent was previously equalized for same-sex couples in the following countries or territories before German annexation or establishment of reichskommissariats: (), (), (), and ().

All countries and territories listed that where annexed or established into reichskommissariats by Nazi Germany during World War II where restored as independent countries or reincorporated into their previous countries during or after the war and thus re-legalized equal age of consent laws for same-sex couples in those areas.

List • 1924: • 1933: (includes and the ) • 1934: • 1940: • 1942: Switzerland (nationwide) • 1944: • 1951: • • • 1956: • 1961: • 1962: • • 1967: • 1968: • • 1969: • West Germany • 1971: • • • • 1972: • • • 1973: • • • • 1974: • • 1975: • • • • 1976: • • • • • • • 1977: • • • • • • 1978: • • • • 1979: • • 1980: • • • 1981: • • • 1982: • 1983: • • • • • 1984: • 1985: • 1986: • 1988: • 1989: • • 1990: • • 1991: • • • • 1992: • • • • 1993: • • • • • • • • • 1994: • • • • 1995: • • 1996: • • • • • 1997: • • • • • 1998: • • • • Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina • • • • 1999: • • 2000: • • 21st century • • • Northern Africa LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGBT people allowed to serve openly in military Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression Illegal since 1966 Penalty: Fine and up to 2 years imprisonment.

( of ) Legal since 1979 + UN decl. sign. De facto unions legal since 2003 Legal since 2005 Legal since 2005 Spain responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Since 2007, all documents can be amended to the recognised gender ( of ) Legal since 1979 + UN decl. sign. De facto union since 1998 Legal since 2005 Legal since 2005 Spain responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Since 2007, all documents can be amended to the recognised gender / Male legal, but illegal since 2000 Penalty: Up to 17 years imprisonment with or without hard labour and with or without fines under broadly-written morality laws.

Female uncertain. Illegal since 1953 (Autonomous region of ) Legal since 1983 + UN decl. sign. Legal since 2010 Legal since 2016 Portugal responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination. Since 2011, all documents can be amended to the recognised gender ( of ) Legal since 1979 + UN decl. sign. De facto union since 2008 Legal since 2005 Legal since 2005 Spain responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Since 2007, all documents can be amended to the recognised gender (including ) Illegal since 1962 Penalty: Up to 3 years imprisonment.

(Disputed territory; excluding ) Illegal since 1944 (as part of the ) Penalty: Up to 3 years imprisonment. Illegal since 1899 (as ) Penalty: Up to 10 years imprisonment. Constitutional ban since 2011 Illegal since 1899 (as ) Penalty: Death penalty on third offense for men and on fourth offense for women.

Illegal since 1913 (as the ) Penalty: 3 years imprisonment. Legalization proposed Western Africa LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military?

Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country); Age of consent discrepancy Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) Constitutional ban since 1991 Legal since 2004 + UN decl.

sign. Bans some anti-gay discrimination Illegal since 1888 (as the ) Penalty: Up to Iife imprisonment. Male illegal since 1860s (as the ) Penalty: 10 years imprisonment or more. Female always legal Illegal since 1988 Penalty: 6 months to 3 years imprisonment. Legal since 1993 + UN decl. sign. Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country); Age of consent discrepancy Illegal since 1976 Penalty: 1 year imprisonment. Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) Illegal since 1983 Penalty: Death by .

Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country); Age of consent discrepancy Illegal under federal law since 1901 (as the and the ) Penalty: Up to 14 years imprisonment. Death in the states of , , , , , , , , , , , and . Illegal since 1966 Penalty: 1 to 5 years imprisonment. Male illegal since 1861 (as the ) Penalty: Up to life imprisonment (Not enforced). Female always legal + UN decl. sign. Illegal since 1884 (as ) Penalty: Fine and 3 years imprisonment.

Central Africa LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military? Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression Illegal since 1972 Penalty: Fines to 5 years imprisonment.

Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) + UN decl. sign. Constitutional ban since 2016 Illegal since 2017 Penalty: 3 months to 2 years imprisonment.

Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) Constitutional ban since 2005 Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) + UN decl.

sign. Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country); Age of consent discrepancy ( of the ) Legal since 2001 + UN decl. sign. Legal since 2017 Legal since 2017 Legal since 2017 UK responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay on discrimination Legal since 2012 + UN decl.

sign. Southeast Africa LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military?

Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression Illegal since 2009 Penalty: 3 months to 2 years imprisonment. Constitutional ban since 2005 Illegal since 1897 (as the ) Penalty: up to 14 years imprisonment. Constitutional ban since 2010 Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) + UN decl.

sign. Constitutional ban since 2003 Illegal since 1864 (only ) Illegal since 1899 Penalty: Up to life imprisonment. Male illegal since 1894 Penalty: Up to life imprisonment. Female uncertain Constitutional ban since 2005 Horn of Africa LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military?

Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) Illegal since 1957 (as part of the ) Penalty: Up to 3 years imprisonment.

Illegal Penalty: 10 years imprisonment or more. Illegal since 1962 Penalty: Up to death. (Disputed territory) Illegal Penalty: Up to death. Indian Ocean states LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military?

Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression Illegal since 1982 Penalty: 5 years imprisonment and fines.

(Overseas territory of ) Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the territory) since 1999 Legal since 2013 Legal since 2013 France responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Under French law Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country); Age of consent discrepancy Male illegal since 1838 (as part of ) Penalty: Up to 5 years imprisonment.

Female always legal + UN decl. sign. Bans all anti-gay discrimination (Overseas region of ) Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the region) since 1999 Legal since 2013 Legal since 2013 France responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Under French law (Overseas region of ) Legal since 1791 since 1999 Legal since 2013 Legal since 2013 France responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Under French law Legal since 2016 + UN decl.

sign. Bans some anti-gay discrimination Southern Africa LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military?

Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression illegal since 1886 (as part of the ) Penalty: Fines, restrictions or penal labor (Not enforced). Legalization pending Bans some anti-gay discrimination May possibly change gender under the Código do Registro Civil 2015 Illegal since 1885 (as part of the ) Penalty: Fine to up to 7 years imprisonment (Not enforced).

Legalization pending Bans some anti-gay discrimination Legal gender change recognized as a constitutional right since 2017 Male illegal since the 1880s Female always legal Male legal since 2012 Female always legal May possibly change gender under the National Identity Cards Act 9 of 2011 Illegal since 1891 (as part of the Shire Highlands Protectorate and the Nyasaland Districts Protectorate) Penalty: Up to 14 years imprisonment and whippings (Law suspended from usage since 2012).

Legal since 2015 Bans some anti-gay discrimination Male illegal since 1920 (as part of ) Female always legal Under the Births, Marriages and Deaths Registration Act 81 of 1963 Male legal since 1998 Female always legal + UN decl.

sign. Limited recognition of unregistered partnerships since 1998; same-sex marriage since 2006 Since 1998 Bans all anti-gay discrimination Anti-discrimination laws are interpreted to include gender identity; legal gender may be after surgical or medical treatment Illegal since 1911 (as part of the ) Penalty: up to 14 years imprisonment. Male illegal since 1891 (as part of the ) Female legal Constitutional ban since 2013 Americas • • • North America LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression ( of the ) Legal since 1994; Age of consent discrepancy + UN decl.

sign. since 2018 Legal since November 2018 and between May 2017 and May 2018 Legal since 2015 UK responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Legal since 1969 + UN decl. sign. Domestic partnerships in (2001); (2002); Adult interdependent relationships in (2003); (2004) Legal in some provinces and territories since 1996, nationwide since 2010 Since 1992 Bans all anti-gay discrimination. Transgender people can change their gender and name without and human rights protections explicitly include gender identity or expression within all of Canada since 2017 (autonomous constituent country of the ) Legal since 1933 + UN decl.

sign. Registered partnerships since 1996 Legal since 2016 Stepchild adoption since 2009; joint adoption since 2016 Since 1978 () Bans some anti-gay discrimination Legal since 1871 + UN decl. sign. / in (2007), Coahuila (2007), Colima (2013), Campeche (2013), Jalisco (2014), Michoacán (2015) and Tlaxcala (2017) / Legal in (2010), (2012), (2014), (2015), (2015), (2016), (2016), (2016), (2016), (2016), (2017), (2017) and (2017).

All states are obliged to honour same-sex marriages performed in states where it is legal. The Supreme Court has declared that it is unconstitutional to deny marriage licenses to same-sex couples in all states, but as state laws were not invalidated, individual injunctions must still be obtained from the courts / Legal in Mexico City (2010), Coahuila (2014), Chihuahua (2015), Michoacán (2016), Colima (2016), Morelos (2016), Campeche (2016), Veracruz (2016), Baja California (2017), Querétaro (2017), Chiapas (2017) and Puebla (2017) [ ] Bans all anti-gay discrimination / Transgender persons can change their legal gender and name in Mexico City (2008), Michoacán (2017) and Nayarit (2017) (Overseas collectivity of ) Legal since 1791 + UN decl.

sign. since 1999 Legal since 2013 Legal since 2013 Bans all anti-gay discrimination Under French law + UN decl. sign.

Domestic partnerships in (1999), the (2002), (2004), (2008), (2008), and (2009); Civil unions in (2007), (2011), (2012), and (2013) Legal in some states since 1993, nationwide since 2016 "" policy was abolished in 2011, meaning that since then LGB people have been allowed to serve openly in the military. Transgender people have been allowed to serve in the military since 2018 / Federal executive order prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation for employees in the , along with government employment in the , and the , since 1998 (see and ).

. . in 24 states + D.C. / Gender identity discrimination in healthcare insurance banned since 2012. Allowed to change gender under various conditions in 47 states + D.C.

. in 23 states + D.C. Central America LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression Legal since 2016 Bans all anti-gay discrimination Legal since 1971 + UN decl. sign. Unregistered cohabitation since 2014 / To become legal by 2020 at the latest Pending Bans all anti-gay discrimination Transgender persons can change their legal gender without surgeries or judicial permission since 2018 Legal since 1822 + UN decl.

sign. Constitutional ban pending; court decision pending [ ] Bans all anti-gay discrimination Legal since 1871 + UN decl. sign. Pending Bans some anti-gay discrimination Legal since 1899 + UN decl. sign. Constitutional ban since 2005; court decision pending Bans all anti-gay discrimination Legal since 2008 + UN decl. sign. Bans some anti-gay discrimination Legal since 2008 + UN decl. sign. Court decision pending Court decision pending Bans some anti-gay discrimination Transgender persons can change their legal gender and name after since 2006 Caribbean LGBT rights in: Same-sex sexual activity Recognition of same-sex unions Same-sex marriage Adoption by same-sex couples LGB people allowed to serve openly in military Anti-discrimination laws concerning sexual orientation Laws concerning gender identity/expression ( of the ) Legal since 2001 + UN decl.

sign. UK responsible for defence Illegal Penalty: 15-year prison sentence (Not enforced). (Constituent country of the ) Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) + UN decl. sign. Registered partnerships since 2016 / Same-sex marriages performed in the recognized The responsible for defence Legal since 1991; Age of consent discrepancy + UN decl.

sign. Illegal Penalty: Life imprisonment (Not enforced). Legalization proposed ( of the ) Legal since 2001 + UN decl. sign. UK responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination (, and ; special municipalities of the ) Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the municipalities) + UN decl. sign. Legal since 2012 The responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination ( of the ) Legal since 2001; Age of consent discrepancy + UN decl.

sign. / Same-sex couples recognized for immigration purposed since 2016 Court decision pending UK responsible for defence Legal since 1979 + UN decl. sign. Constitutional ban since 1976; legalization pending [ ] Bans some anti-gay discrimination Transgender people allowed to change gender after sex change operations (Constituent country of the ) Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) + UN decl. sign. Pending / Same-sex marriages performed in the recognized The responsible for defence Illegal Penalty: 10-year prison sentence or incarceration in a psychiatric institution (Not enforced).

+ UN decl. sign. Legal since 1822 + UN decl. sign. Constitutional ban since 2010 Male illegal Penalty: 10-year prison sentence (Not enforced). Female always legal (Overseas department of ) Legal since 1791 + UN decl. sign. since 1999 Legal since 2013 Legal since 2013 France responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Under French law Legal since 1791 (as ) Male illegal Penalty: 10 years hard labor (Not enforced).

Female always legal. Constitutional ban since 1962 (Overseas department of ) Legal since 1791 + UN decl. sign. since 1999 Legal since 2013 Legal since 2013 France responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Under French law ( of the ) Legal since 2001 + UN decl.

sign. Constitutional ban since 2010 UK responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination ( of the ) Legal since 2003 Since 2015 Legal since 2015 Legal since 2015 United States responsible for defense Bans some anti-gay discrimination Gender change legal since 2018; does not require surgery (Overseas collectivity of ) Legal since 1791 + UN decl. sign. since 1999 Legal since 2013 Legal since 2013 France responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Under French law Male illegal Penalty: 10 years (Not enforced).

Female always legal Male illegal Penalty: Fine and/or 10-year prison sentence (Not enforced). Female always legal (Overseas collectivity of ) Legal since 1791 + UN decl.

sign. since 1999 Legal since 2013 Legal since 2013 France responsible for defence Bans all anti-gay discrimination Under French law Illegal Penalty: Fine and/or 10-year prison sentence (Not enforced). (Constituent country of the ) Legal (No laws against same-sex sexual activity have ever existed in the country) + UN decl.

sign. / Same-sex marriages performed in the recognized The responsible for defence Legal since 2018 ( of the ) Legal since 2001 + UN decl. sign.


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What are the best gay bars in the UK? Here’s our recommendations for gay bars in the UK… Gay dating in Manchester With its own Gay Village, Manchester is a hot spot for and dates starting on .

Expect a friendly atmosphere and a buzzing night life. Here are some ideas to get you started. Lammars Just across from the Gay Village this once hidden gem has been voted best bar in Manchester for two years in a row.

Named after the infamous Manchester drag queen Frank ‘Foo Foo’ Lammar, this bar is full of character, with crushed velvet couches and styling which will delight any visitor, gay or straight. Tribeca Featuring a lounge bar with real beds, this Manhattan-style gay bar is buzzing with Sex and the City style and softly lit with a sultry feel. Good value drinks and nibbles add to its appeal, and champagne cocktails for £5 are a must for a fun Saturday night.

Company Bar If house music and muscular men float your boat then this basement bar could be the one for you. With a cosy, welcoming atmosphere and a mixed crowd, this could well be the scene for some fun-filled dating. Gay dating in Brighton Brighton has often been christened the gay capital of England, and not without good reason. This seaside town oozes charm and character and offers a multitude of great venues for gay dating. Legends Bar & Basement Club Seated below Legends Hotel, this stylish bar/club has two floors.

A stylish bar with a twinkly ceiling that offers sea views from its beach facing terrace and a basement nightclub with a range of club nights. Best of all, entry is free, and it’s open 7 days a week. Charles Street This is one of Brighton’s busiest gay bars with a chic clientele and plenty of drinks and cocktails on offer.

Located near most of the clubs and night spots, this is a fun, friendly place to begin a night, especially if you’re thinking of combining your date with a club or two. The Marlborough Across from the Brighton Pavilion, this bar is popular with lesbian crowds but also welcomes mixed or gay clientele and has a laid back, unpretentious atmosphere.

With a small theatre and a café to boot, this quirky bar will appeal to fans of culture-packed dating. Gay dating in London Last but not least, with one of the world’s most varied and lively gay scenes, London is great choice for gay dating. From the streets of Soho to South London, there is something for everyone in this capital city. Compton’s of Soho This long established gay bar is a favourite of Soho’s socialites and was around before any of the bars in the Soho area. Its upstairs section, with traditional décor and chandeliers, is ideal for getting to know one another gay dates where you want to be able to hear your partner talk without the club atmosphere.

First Out This is a gay friendly café bar with a difference. The eclectic crowd and vegetarian/vegan menu makes First Out a great place for day time dates. You can also catch exhibitions by gay and lesbian artists from time to time. For the ladies, there’s also the ‘Girl Fridays’ night which runs every Friday in the basement bar.

Friendly Society One for the hipsters, this charismatic bar has retro relics and kitsch ornaments galore. With an L shaped layout there’s also a quieter corner for dates to sit and sip a tipple or two.


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Traveling with your significant other can be fun, romantic and bring you closer together. This is a list of the best gay , ranked by travelers and locals alike.

Every year, thousands of travel the world, taking in beautiful sights and ancient cultures. Which is the best gay travel destination? Vote on this list and make sure the best gay vacation spot ends up number one.

Gay marriage is legal in California making the state a top spot for destination weddings. San Francisco is especially popular as the city is a big proponent of gay rights. San Francisco’s Castro district is home to the largest gay neighborhood in the United States.

Visitors can take in a show at the historic Castro Theatre and then enjoy a stroll over to the Haight-Ashbury district to see the famous sights associated with the hippy movement. Paris is also a great city for LGBT travel.

The City of Lights puts on one of the parades with attendance reaching over 1 million people. If you are looking to spend your vacation on a beach, Australia and New Zealand both offer some of the most gay friendly beaches in the world.Which is the best gay travel destination? Vote on this list and tell us why a certain spot is great for the LGBT community in the comments section.

Photo: via Reddit 1


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