Best dating in grad school degrees to get

best dating in grad school degrees to get

Perhaps expectedly, daters with a graduate degree are most likely to consider a B.A. mandatory in a mate, followed by those with a college-level education. But even among OkCupid members who attended grad school, only 46% of women and 35% of men said they wouldn’t date someone because he or she hadn’t gone to college But what are these recent graduates actually talking about? Well, we took a look at that, too. We (anonymously) combed through the messages of over 5,000 recent grads on OkCupid and found that academics is the last thing on their brains. Instead, this is: Their messages may as well say “School’s out for summer.” Recent grads are not only more likely to mention the above than any other daters, but they also mention the below significantly less

best dating in grad school degrees to get

If you’re getting close to finishing your bachelor’s degree, you’re probably grappling with the choice of what to do once you graduate.

Join the workforce? Apply for grad school? Or take another path? Maybe you’ve heard this sentiment before (I definitely have): “I don’t know what I want to do with my life so I guess I’ll go to grad school.” Trust me—this is not a strong enough reason on its own to commit to 2 more years of study.

Grad school is a great place for deepening your knowledge in a particular area, but it can also be gruelling, costly, and doesn’t always guarantee employment. When considering grad school, it’s important to take a step back and think deeply about why you want to go. Know yourself Don’t treat grad school as the next, inevitable step without doing some serious soul-searching.

Here are some questions I found helpful when deciding if grad school was right for me. Hopefully, they can help to clarify if grad school is the right option for you, too. What are my career goals? Will grad school help me achieve them? Grad school is a big commitment and it’s best to have clearly defined goals and a good idea of how grad school can help you achieve those goals before you apply.

Some careers—like lawyers, doctors, and accountants—require a graduate degree. Also, if you want to teach, do research, or become an expert in your field, grad school is almost certainly the right choice. So, if you know you want a career in one of these fields, the choice is pretty straightforward. But the line leading from area of study to eventual career can become a lot more blurred in other fields, especially in the humanities and social sciences.

It’s not immediately clear if a Master of Arts in Political Science will get you a job in politics, for example, or if a Master of Fine Arts will get you a job as an artist. While graduate degrees in these fields can be helpful, they do not guarantee employment. If you feel like your undergraduate degree did not give you enough training to prepare for a career, you might consider a more skills-oriented or applied graduate program, with components like practicums or internships, that can help give your career a head start once you graduate.

I don’t have a specific career goal in mind—will going to grad school help me explore my interests and lead to other opportunities? Of course, not everyone has their life plan completely mapped out, and that’s okay. And not all graduate degrees need to be done with a specific career focus in mind. There is definitely value in learning for the sake of learning, if you have the time, means, and motivation to do it.

Even if you’re not 100% sure of the kind of job you want, grad school can open up a lot of opportunities by allowing you to do a deep dive into a subject that you are passionate about. Having access to all of the amazing resources a university has to offer is a huge plus. Grad school can also give you a structured environment in which to practice and develop your skills.

For example, if you want to get into creative writing, pursuing an MFA may be a good choice because you will have the opportunity to write on a regular basis and obtain feedback from your profs and classmates.

If you’re thinking about specific graduate programs, it’s a smart idea to reach out to the program administrator at the schools you’re considering.

Ask them questions to find out more about the program and if it can help you get where you want to be. Reach out to people already in the program and ask them about their experience. That’s what I did when I was deciding which grad school to go to.

Talking to students who were currently in my program of interest was extremely insightful—and ultimately helped me decide to pursue graduate studies. Will it be more effective to join the workforce to achieve my goals? In some industries, work experience tends to be more valuable than the book-learning you do in grad school. That’s because certain grad degrees can focus more on theory, whereas employers really value hands-on experience and practical skills.

Do some research and see what kind of education and experience is required in the field you want to work in. Make a list of the different jobs you think you might want in the future. Dig in to the requirements—you can find these in job postings—and see what is typically requested. Do they ask for graduate degrees? Or work experience?

If you don’t know whether or not it will be more valuable to gain work experience, reach out to people in the industry. Ask your friends if they know anyone working in your field of interest and if you can meet them for a chat. Look for people on LinkedIn with the job title you want. While the internet has a wealth of information, it is rarely as useful as talking to real people with real world experiences.

I’ve also found that people are generally open to giving advice and sharing their wisdom. Ask and you might just receive. Can I afford to go to grad school? Graduate school is expensive. And while there are often entrance scholarships, bursaries, and other forms of financial aid available, you may also need to take out a student loan. Consider your current debt level, tuition costs, job prospects, and the expected salary once you graduate. A key benefit of forgoing a master’s degree is the ability to save money by avoiding tuition fees and the opportunity to earn money and work experience.

If you’ve already got heaps of student debt, it might not be the best option to jump right into another huge expense. If you really want to go to grad school, consider working for a year or two to pay down your current debt and save what you can for future schooling. Remember: you’re never too old to go back to school and getting some work experience can even bolster your grad school application by making you a more well-rounded candidate.

Why I chose to go to grad school for journalism In my case, I wanted to make a career change, into an area where I had no direct experience. I studied history and political science for my undergraduate degree and then moved abroad for 5 years, where I gained some valuable work experience (writing, editing, and social media marketing), but it was not relevant enough to ensure easy access to jobs in journalism. Journalism does not require graduate studies by any means, and I could have started just doing freelance journalism work.

But I would have been starting from scratch and I’m the kind of person who likes to learn in a structured environment. The job market in journalism is currently very competitive and it's an industry in flux. There would be no guarantee of success if I tried to do it without any training.

I’m still not guaranteed success but at least I’m gaining relevant experience, training, and skills that will give me a head start when I enter the job market. Ultimately, grad school is helping to open up a door that would have been much harder to open if I tried to make it on my own. There’s no wrong choice, only what’s right for you can be difficult.

In the end, it’s up to you to make the choice that is right for you. Just make sure you give yourself time to reflect and weigh your options, and to understand what’s motivating you to pursue grad school or another path.


best dating in grad school degrees to get

best dating in grad school degrees to get - How to Get Into Grad School?


best dating in grad school degrees to get

Hello Everyone! Im currently an undergrad student that is majoring in CS. I wanted to go to Grad School for an extra degree. Before, I wanted to go to Law School as this was my second best interest but the topic of "Does this help your CS degree" comes up alot which kind of makes sense. The next thing I heard which kind of makes sense in my head is to go to Business school.

A degree in Economics could do nicely, atleast thats how i thought of it in my head. Im going to be doing alot of math anyway so why not I thought. What do you guys think? Any tips? Don't go to graduate school just because you want an "extra degree." Get a graduate of professional degree because you have a reason to get it, not just because you think it would arbitrarily go well with CS.

What would be useful depends on what you want to do, which it sounds like you're really not sure of. So this is a bad time to get a graduate degree. Masters and law degrees are expensive, and it makes no sense to sink yourself into debt for it when you don't know what you plan to do with it. I agree with simba that your best bet is to work for a few years if you don't have a goal for why you want a graduate degree.

I completely agree with ! Work for a few years, and you'll have a much better idea of your career interests once you have work experience. My husband opted to work for several years prior to getting his MBA and it was the best decision he could have made.

Most of the top programs require work experience anyhow, and his interests/strengths morphed once he got into the work force. Good luck!


best dating in grad school degrees to get

INSIDE THE GRADUATE SCHOOL ADMISSIONS DEPARTMENT Expert Guidance on the Application Process and Tips for Crafting a Standout Essay Applying to graduate school is a lot of work, and often, prospective students don’t know where to start or what to showcase in their school applications. Discover what graduate admissions departments look for in candidates, learn how to craft a winning admission essay, and find resources and expert tips to help you navigate the admissions process.

Applying to graduate school is nothing if not a complex process - organizational skills are must. Prospective students preparing to apply to schools should invest in a calendar to help keep them on track through the various steps in the process. Review the following application timeline for an in-depth look at what the application process may detail. Month 12 3 Months Before the Application Deadline – Letters of Recommendation: The interest left standing is your area of concentration.

With your program in mind and the research you’ve completed, make a list of potential schools. Start researching your program at those institutions more in depth. Research online and request materials about your program of interest from those schools. As you research keep costs in mind and potential financial aid sources, application requirements for each school and deadlines.

Month 11 2 Months Before Application Deadline Carefully examine each of the program application. Write down any questions you have and make a list of required application materials: letters of recommendation, admissions essays, transcripts, standardized test scores, resume, and work or writing samples. Visit potential schools and connect with current students in the program. Faculty members are busy, so simply send a quick email introducing yourself and your interest in the program. Contact three qualified references including former professors, employers and friends to provide letters of recommendation regarding your character, work ethic and academic performance.

Month 10 1 Month Before Application Deadline Gather letters of recommendation, fill out application forms and write statement of purpose/personal statement, and graduate admissions essays. Make sure transcripts are up to date and request copies from the registrar’s office.

Apply for fellowships, grants and scholarships to help offset the costs of school. Take required tests this month such as the GRE, LSAT, MCAT or GMAT. Month 9 8 months before enrollment/submission of application Complete the application forms for each program, and meet with faculty to review your writing.

Submit applications and all required materials (including financial aid documents for each institution) at least two weeks before they’re due. Create a contingency plan in case you’re not accepted by your top choice.

Month 8 Follow up before the deadline to ensure everything is in order with your application. Most schools send an email upon receipt of each application — keep track of these. If you don't receive a postcard or email, contact the admissions office to ensure that your application has been received before the deadline.

Month 7 Follow up regarding the status of your application before the notification deadline. Write or revise any scholarly writing or research samples to accompany your applications if requested, and re-take standardized tests if required. Complete and submit any applications for programs with rolling admissions or late deadlines.

Month 2 Depending on your field, you may be invited to interview at some of your potential schools. Start planning for the admissions interviews, and prepare answers to common questions. If an interview is optional, take it. You’ll gain more information about the program and to what extent it meets your needs. Month 1 Accept an offer. By doing so and paying a deposit, you are indicating that you have decided not to accept any other offers. To do otherwise in an effort to keep your options open is unethical.

Also, many schools compare notes, and you may jeopardize your standing with both schools/programs. Once your decision is made, notify all admissions offices where you applied of your decision.

Send thank-you notes to those who took the time to write your letters of recommendation and others who assisted you and inform them of your plans. It’s important to maintain lines of communication with contacts and references for the future. Month 12 3 Months Before the Application Deadline – Letters of Recommendation: The interest left standing is your area of concentration.

With your program in mind and the research you’ve completed, make a list of potential schools. Start researching your program at those institutions more in depth. Research online and request materials about your program of interest from those schools.

As you research keep costs in mind and potential financial aid sources, application requirements for each school and deadlines. Month 10 1 Month Before Application Deadline Gather letters of recommendation, fill out application forms and write statement of purpose/personal statement, and graduate admissions essays. Make sure transcripts are up to date and request copies from the registrar’s office. Apply for fellowships, grants and scholarships to help offset the costs of school.

Take required tests this month such as the GRE, LSAT, MCAT or GMAT. Month 8 Follow up before the deadline to ensure everything is in order with your application.

Most schools send an email upon receipt of each application — keep track of these. If you don't receive a postcard or email, contact the admissions office to ensure that your application has been received before the deadline.

Month 1 Accept an offer. By doing so and paying a deposit, you are indicating that you have decided not to accept any other offers. To do otherwise in an effort to keep your options open is unethical.

Also, many schools compare notes, and you may jeopardize your standing with both schools/programs. Once your decision is made, notify all admissions offices where you applied of your decision. Send thank-you notes to those who took the time to write your letters of recommendation and others who assisted you and inform them of your plans. It’s important to maintain lines of communication with contacts and references for the future.

The clearer and more concise applicants are able to articulate why they are interested in pursuing a specific degree and what they hope to do with it will help the committee have a clear picture of the applicants. Earlier conversations with the program to determine the mission and goals of the program and how the applicant may contribute in this context (which is where experience, desire, commitment come in to play) are advisable as well. Todd Hollingshead, Media Relations Manager, BYU CRAFT A WINNING ADMISSIONS ESSAY Your essay is just one of hundreds read by admissions officers every day.

So make it stand out. Separate yourself from what is sure to be a highly qualified and competitive group of applicants. Take this singular opportunity to introduce the committee to the person behind the letters of recommendation, application and transcripts. Tell admissions something they don’t know about you. Get personal. Use your own — albeit professional — voice, avoiding long words and jargon to weave bits and pieces of your personal history throughout your essay.

Use concise, select experiences to answer the when’s, how’s and why’s of your academic and professional goals and to highlight an achievement or work opportunity. Your essay is pivotal. Engaging and well-written, it has the power to trump low test scores or a weak GPA. So give yourself several weeks to write your essay. Getting started is generally the most difficult part, and you may find that you start over several times.

It’s to be expected. But by giving yourself ample time, you can write, ruminate, review and make edits. You have time for others to review your essay(s) and provide valuable feedback. If you’re applying to more than one school, don’t submit a blanket essay to each institution — giving yourself several weeks allows you the time to appropriate your essay to fit each program.

And simply crafting your essays simultaneously preps you for potential interviews. Decide what you want to communicate. Everything you include in your essay should point to that message. Here are a few tips and a simple outline to send you in the right direction. Introduction There are a couple of ways to introduce yourself, and beginning the paragraph with “Hello.

My name … ” is not one of them. Try a more creative and personal approach. Write a short two- or three-sentence anecdote that captures your personality and succinctly describes your initial curiosity in your choice of field. You might start with a quote or question significant to the program, course of study and your interest. Paragraph Three: All about you • What is special about you? What character traits do you possess worth mentioning? Be selective and show, don’t tell.

• Have you overcome any personal hardships to get where you are? • Highlight applicable work experience, research and/or undergraduate accomplishments, and make it personal. Don’t regurgitate your application or resume. • Write cohesively Use proper grammar, syntax and spelling. Review your essays, and have a colleague review them as well.

• Don’t go beyond word count If exact length is not specified, limit the essay to two pages. • Avoid controversial topics and make sure you respond to any questions that are required. • Be human Don’t oversell yourself, and don’t try and guess what the committee wants to hear. • Keep it on point Avoid mention of pre-college accomplishments unless they directly relate to your field. • Highlight accomplishments Your weaknesses — low GPA, low test scores, lack of work experience — don’t belong in your essay.

TODD HOLLINGSHEAD, BYU: INSIDE A GRADUATE SCHOOL ADMISSIONS DEPARTMENT What do you look for in a graduate school applicant?

It varies by graduate program and discipline. Each graduate program has an admissions committee that will review applications using their own established criteria to review and compare applicants for admission. Applicants would do well to communicate with the intended program of admission to try to determine for themselves what the admissions committee is looking for in an ideal applicant.

Alternatively, they could also speak to a current graduate student in that program to gain insights from them. I do think it’s fair to say that all graduate programs are looking to create a cohort of students who have the capacity to enhance the conversation in the classroom and make a significant difference in their field of study. Of course, research-based programs also look for an aligned research interest with faculty in that particular program.

What qualifications do you seek in prospective students? Qualifications will differ among institutions. So check with specific programs to know what is required. In general terms, applicants for BYU and other grad programs must have the following: • Evidence of a 4-year U.S.

bachelor’s degree or equivalent • At least a 3.0 GPA • English proficiency (for International and LPR applicants who are non-native English speakers) Keep in mind these are minimum requirements. At any institution you’ll want to study the specific qualifications for the program to which you’re applying.

Keep in mind, however, that while GPA and test scores are important for graduate admissions, there are other qualifying factors to consider. For certain programs fieldwork, work experience and research, for example, may carry more significance than grades and test scores alone.

Can you detail the admissions process? Like many schools, applications for graduate school at BYU are available and submitted online.

There are, however, institutions that still accept paper applications. Inquire with the programs to which you’re applying their process for submitting application materials.

At BYU, International transcripts and degree certificates are mailed to a third party credential evaluation service provider. This varies among institutions, however, and students should inquire with their prospective programs.

Required test scores through ETS or TOEFL or IELTS can all be sent electronically to a majority of institutions, including BYU, at the request of the applicant. For professional programs — think MBA — an admissions committee will weigh work experience and goals differently than a research-based program. There are a number of programs that also request an interview during the process, though not all programs require this application component.

Do you have tips for preparation or presentation of your materials? As mentioned previously, we suggest applicants visit with current students in their program of interest and with graduate coordinators so they understand what the department is looking for and how they can best showcase that in their application materials.

For example, if you’re applying for a research-based program, aligning yourself with a faculty member who is doing research that interests you is always beneficial, as they can advocate for your admission. In addition, applicants should submit their materials as soon as possible to allow for full consideration.

What are the most common do’s and don’ts of the admissions process? • Generally, don’t have your parents submit your application for you. • Don’t be rude or demeaning in your communication with the admissions staff regarding your application. • Don’t procrastinate submitting your application. • Don’t just assume that your recommenders will write a favorable letter. • Don’t give up if you are not recommended for admission. • Be proactive in the process and know what your responsibilities are.

• Communicate with the graduate program that you intend to apply to and make yourself known to key people by asking questions. • Be positive. What comprises a winning admissions essay? This is subjective and varies by graduate program — each admissions committee will review the statement of intent or admissions essay using its own established criteria or rubric to review and compare applicants. KNOW THE DIFFERENCE: GRADUATE SCHOOL VERSUS UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES While we consider criteria such as GPA and test scores, most programs look for experience in the core competencies needed to be successful in a graduate program.

Related experience, fieldwork, research and industry also help frame an applicant’s ability to enhance and contribute to the conversation.

In other words, there is a lot of information that can be considered if you are applying to graduate study rather than just your GPA, ACT score and perhaps extra-curricular activities.

Additionally, specific experience can trump what might be considered a low GPA or test score in a graduate program context.

Todd Hollingshead, Media Relations Manager, BYU While some similarities exist between undergraduate and graduate programs, there are some key differences between the two. Easily compare how graduate school differs from an undergraduate program to better prepare for graduate school applications. UNDERGRADUATE GRADUATE SCHOOL ADMISSONS Focus on high school achievement; extracurricular activities; personality; institutional fit.

Focus on professional and personal experience as it applies to specific department degree programs; research and industry experience. EXAMINATIONS ACT/SAT scores In-depth exams based on program including the Graduate Record Exam (GRE); Law School Admission Test (LSAT); Medical College Admission Test (MCAT); LENGTH OF PROGRAM Typically 4 years Shortest: 1 ½ years, but can be completed with 4 years. 2012-13 AVERAGE ANNUAL TUITION (includes fees, room and board) $15,000 public institutions; $34,483 private institutions $9,065 public institutions; 19,934 private institutions When applying to graduate school, remember required documentation may differ slightly among programs.

If you’re applying to several institutions, ensure you’re submitting the right information tailored specifically to that school. For most schools, the following materials are all submitted electronically with the online application: • Resume • Application • Work or writing samples • Transcripts • Personal statement • Admissions essays • Standardized test scores • Letters of recommendation GRADUATE SCHOOL ADMISSION PROCESS: ADDITIONAL RESOURCES Applying to graduate school can be time consuming, confusing and often, overwhelming.

To help ease the process, we have compiled a variety of writing, time management and application essay resources below.


Top 5 SURPRISINGLY Highly Educated YouTubers - Jenna Marbles, Furious Pete
Best dating in grad school degrees to get Rating: 8,1/10 588 reviews
Categories: best dating